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20,000 MEN A YEAR 




EXTRA! 


EXTRA! 


"HOLLYWOOD CAVALCADE" 
AN IMMEDIATE SMASH! 





2 


NEW DYNAMO 


“HOLLYWOOD CAVALCADE” 
B.O. SOCKO FROM THE START! 



By BRUCE FOWLER 

LOS ANGELES — If “Hollywood Cavalcade” does not run here at the Four-Star theatre through to Christmas, I’ll eat your 
hat in the ring at the American Legion Stadium — and I don’t mean perhaps! 

As manager of the Four-Star theatre which had the honor of holding the world premiere of this Technicolor production, I 
know I am taking no chances when I make the above statement, because never have I heard such praise on a picture shown here 
— and we have shown the most successful of them ! So, put “Hollywood Cavalcade” down as an entertainment that doesn’t have 
to take its hat off to any 


of the past box office 
sensations. 

Here is what the doctor 
ordered ! “Hollywood Cav- 
alcade” is caviar on any 
type and age of theatre- 
goer’s dish and personally 1 
am proud to be part of a 
business that creates such 
a picture! I am proud be- 
cause it is the only way 1 
can feel, listening to the 
praise my patrons today 
(Thursday) went out of 
their way to pass on to me. 

Yes, the preview last 
(Wednesday) night was 
something I, nor anyone out 
here, shall ever forget. The 
whole of Hollywood turned 
out. So it seemed to me, for 
all of the important produc- 
ers, stars, directors and 
whonot were on hand — and 
'ach paid $11 for the priv 
ilege of attending. It was 
the greatest premiere Hol- 
lywood has given any mo- 
tion picture and the gross 
for the one night’s perform- 
ance was $7440, which went 
to charity. 

But, that ovation “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” got from the indus- 
try was no more enthusiastic 
than that which this picture has 
been enjoying at every perform- 
ance today (Thursday). 

I tell you this town will have 
to do what many of us consider 
impossible to turn out a picture 
this season that will top what I 
sincerely believe “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” will gross. 

There is going to be no hold- 
ing back this production, because 
it sends them out raving. That’s 
our observation today — and to- 
day’s gross will be one of the 
biggest in the history of the 
house. 

We have been turning them 
out all night. 

I know that we’ll have many, 
many days with even a greater 
gross than we have enjoyed to- 
day. Thei-e is no doubt about 
that. 

I’ll give 10 to 1 that when the 
“Hollywood Cavalcade” engage- 
ment has been completed a new 
house record will have been es- 
tablished. 

That prediction goes not only 
for gross, but for run as well. 

It’s a masterpiece any way 
you look at it. 

I have opened many pictures 
and I think I can gauge the fate 
of a picture by the reaction of 
my audiences on the first day. 

And I honestly never beheld 
such sincere enthusiasm as to- 
day’s audiences showed over this 
picture. 

And “Hollywood Cavalcade” 
will not be called upon to face 
a tougher audience of ticket- 
buyers than those out here. When 
they pack them in in this movie- 
wise town, you’ve got something 
— and “Hollywood Cavalcade” 


Producers And Stars At Historic World Premiere 

All Hollywood turned out and gladly paid $11 per ticket to be on hand when Darryl Zanuck presented “Hollywood Cavalcade” 
at the Four-Star Theatre in Los Angeles Wednesday night. In attendance was a turnout that in every way constituted “Who's Who 
in Hollywood.” Among those present were (1) Mr. and Mrs. Don Ameche, (2) Brenda Joyce with her escort, (3) Mr. and Mrs. 
Mervyn Leroy, (4) Myrna Yoy and her husband-producer (5) Mr. and Mrs. Zanuck, (6) Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., 
and Jr., (7) Mr. and Mrs. David Selznick, (8) Mr. and Mrs. Harry Joe Brown, (9) Burns and Allen, (10) Barbara Stanwyck and 
Robert Taylor, (11) Jack Benny and Mary Livingstone, (12) Dr. Martin and Louella Parsons, (13) Jeanette MacDonald, (14) Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel Goldwyn, (15) Virginia Field and Richard Greene, and (16) Constance Bennett and Roland Young. 








starts where other Technicolor 
hits left off. 

I am probably spending too 
much money telegraphing this 
report, but you can tell Mr. 


Spyros Skouras and all the other 
showmen that if “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” doesn’t jam them in, 
nothing can. 

I am certain that the great au- 


dience reaction here will be dup- 
licated everywhere. If money 
talks, today’s experience here, 
convinces me “Hollywood Caval- 
cade” is going to be found 


speaking in thunderous terms. 

The critics raved their heads 
off! 

And that offer about the hat 
stands! 





NEW DYNAMO 


3 


CINCINNATI REPORTS SRO 
WITH NEW RECORD IN SIGHT 


Everything that all who had seen Zanuck’s first 1939-40 Technicolor super special, “Hollywood Cavalcade,” predicted it would 
be, that prediction Friday was turning into concrete fact! A wire from the Cincinnati theatre manager Friday morning indi- 
cated that this great attraction was not only given an ovation, but packed them in that previous night. 

Stacked up against the biggest opposition Cincinnati could offer, the world’s series, in which every human there is personally 
interested and follows to the last out, “Hollywood Cavalcade” got off to a flying start Thursday at its first engagement east of 

Los Angeles. 


New York Exhibitors Gladly Join Praise Parade! 

Nationally known exhibitors, circuit operators and bookers and independent exhibitors joined the New York exchange dollar 
delivery crew in applauding “Hollywood Cavalcade” when it was given a trade showing at the Ziegfield theatre in New York 
Tuesday morning. Among those present were: (1) Walter Reade, Jr., Harry Buxbaum, Arthur Waycoff and A1 Mendelsohn; (2) 
Mrs. Florin Seymour and attaches from the Snaper circuit; (3) W. Brown, Elizabeth, N. J.; (4) A critic; (5) W. Schutzer, 
Peter Fishman, Seymour Jones and a friend of the latter; (6) Joe Lee and Wilbur Snaper; (7) B. S. Moss at whose old 
Broadway theatre in New York the first Mack Sennett’s bathing beauties personally and on the screen made their debut; (8) 
M. Davis of Randforce circuit, and George Longbart; (9) Seymour Florin, Leon Kuttler, Abe Blumstein, Bob Brodkin and the 
latter’s sister; (10) A1 Mendelsohn, George Blenderman, Abe Blumstein, Walter Schutzer, Francis Bregman, Louis Kuttler and 
Peter Fishman, and (11) A. J. Barriault, Hyannis, Mass., newspaperman, Roger Ferri and Harry Buxbaum. 


Crowded in when news- 
papers turned their entire 
resources to coverage of the 
world series, “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” smashed through 
this terrific competition and 
brought down crowded 
houses Thursday night to 
applause that left no doubt 
in the mind of the manager 
that it would establish a 
new record. 



EXHIBITORS LEAD CHEERS'! 


Coast Premiere Historic And Unprecedented Success! 
Branch Managers Predict “Alexander” Business! 


Several thousand exhibitors from big and small towns led the 
week’s cheering of “Hollywood Cavalcade.” Branches were flooded 
with congratulatory wires and letters from showmen who were at 
various theatres where this Zanuck triumph was given a trade 
showing this week. 

Hundreds of these wires and letters reached this desk. In fact, 
they were so numerous that it would require at least 20 pages to 
reprint them. 

Typical of the circuit operators’ viewpoint was this opinion from 
Rick Ricketson of Denver : “I don’t know what top box office picture 


to compare this to, but we know that here is a picture that will be 
tops at the box office.” 

Harry Schreiber of the RKO theatres in Columbus, 0., said: 
“Something different and very novel and should prove one of the 
season’s outstanding attractions.” 

Typical of the small-town exhibitors’ opinion was this expression 
from Charles Wilson of the Bijou, Troy, N. Y.: “Swell picture — and 
swell from any angle. Particularly swell for box office purposes.” 
William Kraemer of the Schine circuit in the Washington terri- 
tory wrote: “Great. Sustained love interest, pathos, beauty. This 
picture has everything.” Continued on Page 6 


To no greater test could, 
or will, “Hollywood Caval- 
cade” be put than it is being 
subjected to in Cincinnati. 

A wire to the Home Office Fri- 
day morning reported an audi- 
ence reaction that surpassed all 
expectations. 

Even with most Cincinnatians’ 
ears glued to the radio listening 
to progress of the world’s series 
games in New York, “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” opened to a matinee’s 
business twice greater than that 
of the attraction it had just suc- 
ceeded. 

But, even more corroborative 
of the trade’s expectations that 
“Hollywood Cavalcade” will es- 
tablish new earnings records was 
word from Los Angeles regard- 
ing the sensational first public 
showing of the production there 
on Thursday, following the his- 
toric $11 world premiere at the 
Four-Star theatre there the pre- 
vious evening. 

Like newspapers in Cincinnati, 
the sheets in Los Angeles car- 
ried out-and-out rave reviews. 

THE REVIEWS 

Editorials bespoke the trade 
press’ enthusiastic reaction to 
this production. 

Chester B. Bahn of Film 
Daily, for instance, editorially 
wrote: “First rate entertain- 

ment, this Darryl F. Zanuck pro- 
duction in Technicolor is right 
down the American fan’s alley.” 

Arthur James, writing in the 
New York Film Curb, shouted: 
“This is a surefire offering that 
any theatre will be glad to pre- 
sent as it will more than satisfy 
audiences. It is one of the great- 
est entertainments of the sea- 
son.” 

Hollywood Reporter head- 
lined: “Twentieth Century-Fox 
has a definite hit and one that 
should fit into the top bracket 
of ticket sellers in any part of 
the world, whether in war-torn 
Europe, in the farthest reaches 
of South America or here in the 
American theatres. It will 
stimulate every box office.” 

Los Angeles Examiner said: 
“To Darryl Zanuck goes our 
thanks for giving us a picture 
that offers such entertainment. 
The house rocked with laughter.” 

Los Angeles Times observed: 
“ ‘Hollywood Cavalcade’ is a 
‘must’ picture for the film audi- 
ence in general. Bouquets be- 
long to all.” 

Los Angeles Evening Herald 
and Express: “A great picture 
of a great industry that every- 
one will hurry to see. It can’t 
help pleasing every type of mov- 
iegoer.” 

The Hollywood Citizen edito- 
rialized on the production. It 
said: “It takes a great picture 
to vision the progress of so great 
an industry. ‘Hollywood Caval- 
cade’ tackled that job. And a 
great job it is, too.” 




4 


NEW DYNAMO 



Coast And Midwest Positions Threatened By 
Maneuvers Of Certain Big Eastern Offices 


Reflecting definitely the healthiest buildup in advance rentals through 
superb surveillance of bookings and, in the meantime, capitalizing on the 
earning potentialities of every foot of available film, Landis’ Indianapolis and 
Wheeler’s Washingtonians are, understandably, causing the Coast pacers of 
the Kent Drive to do small amount of worrying! 

These two offices, in particular, continue to give the Western leaders the greatest 
concern — for the very good reason that their opposition to a threatened monopoly of 
prize-paying positions by Coast, Southern and Midwestern branches has come from 
Washington and Indianapolis. 

With the coming week bringing the first half of the Drive to a close, the position of 
Washington and Indianapolis, in the eyes of prize-carrying berth seekers, becomes more 
menacing than ever, as their revenue promises to hit and attain a weekly quota level. 

Dillon’s Los Angeles continue to lead the departmental parade on accumulated delivery, not only 
among the Nationals in the Drive, but for the K-7 season itself. Ballentine’s San Francisco will get 
stronger, Mr. Wobber expects. And last week Walker’s Salt Lake Citians furnished no vague evidence 
of their readiness to have plenty to say about which office shall finish first in the International sector 
of the Big Push. 

As the field was applying the finishing touches to the eighth week of the Drive, President S. R. 
Kent, who returned to New York Friday, and Chairman of the Board Joseph M. Schenck, were going 
into a huddle with Mr. Wobber. 

However, from the field came information that led Home Office officials to predict that the eighth 
week’s Drive revenue would exceed that of the corresponding week last year. 

Nevertheless, the company cannot view the Drive as a success until the department hits weekly 
quota delivery. That goal is being rapidly approached. 

On accumulated nine weeks’ delivery for the season, the wealthiest place gain was turned in by the 
chapter’s lone over-quota star, Walker’s Salt Lake City which romped from 17th to seventh place, 
within one-tenth of a point of Indianapolis. And Indianapolis is one point behind Simon’s alert 
New Haveners who will have to be reckoned with where the International group championship 
is concerned. 

New Haven trails Skorey’s Calgary by one point, with Washington 4.8 ahead of the Canadians and 
only two points to the rear of the San Franciscans on the nine weeks’ returns. 

Sturm’s Detroiters hopped a pair, while Boston and Oklahoma City dropped rather hard, enabling 
English’s Montreal and Beiersdorf’s Dallas to advance three apiece. St. Louis lost four. 

Gross’ Philadelphians, Powers’ Portlanders, Cohn’s Pittsburghers, Samson’s Buffaloans and Bux- 
baum’s New Yorkers also inherited better spots. 

Kupper’s West leads the divisional race for the season’s delivery, heading Gehring’s Centrals by 
five points and Sussman’s East by 6.9. Coast stayed on top of the district heap, five points above 
Bailey’s Northeast. Moss’ Atlantics went into the fifth position at the expense of Ballance’s South, 
which the former leads now by four-tenths of a place. Roberts’ Mideast trailed South by 3.9 and was 
5.1 more powerful than Levy’s Prairies. 

Cohn’s Pittsburghers banged away very effectively in their campaign to overtake their district 
colleagues, the Washingtonians, in the season’s short subjects delivery race. The Buccaneers again 
beat their Movietone-Terrytoon quota. 

Again Herman Beiersdorf’s Texans distinguished themselves on short subjects delivery. They beat 
quota. Their Drive sixth week’s delivery in this department shot them up from 35th to 17th place in 
accumulated eight weeks’ status for the season. 

English’s Montreal, too, exceeded their fixed mark on shorts in the past week. In the season’s 
eight weeks’ accumulated standing the Royalists rode from 14 to 6, almost catching Reingold’s St. 
Louis. 

Dillon’s Los Angeles continues showing the way on Movietone News delivery. Last week Los 
Angeles again beat quota as did Wilson’s Atlanta, Longdon’s Charlotte, Gross’ Philadelphia and 
Buxbaum’s New York. 

Ballentine’s San Franciscans missed their News quota last week by only $1. Pittsburgh muffed 
it by $5. Morrison’s Denver went over the line for the first time this season. 

On adsales delivery, for the season’s nine-week period, Bob Bandy of Dallas succeeded Morris Wein- 
stein of New Haven to' the throne, although the latter retained his Drive leadership. 

The district and divisional leaderships in every dollar delivery standing for the season remained 
unchanged as the result of last week’s developments. 


K 7 TOTAL DELIVERY 


Nino Weeks’ Standing 




Following is the standing of all branches, districts and divisions on accumulated 
nine weeks’ total delivery against the 1939-40 total delivery quota for that period, 
as of September 30: 

BRANCHES 


Sept 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

30tl 

Branch (Manager) 

23rd 

300 

Branch (Manager) 

23rd 

1 

Los Angeles (Dillon) .... 

. . . . 1 

20 

Chicago (Eekhardt) 

. . . 20 


San Francisco (Ballentine) 

... 2 

21 

Memphis (Young) 

... 21 

3 

Washington (Wheeler) 

. .. . 3 

22 

Cincinnati (Grady) 

... 22 

4 

Calgary (Skorey) 

. . . . 4 

23 



5 

New Haven (Simon) .... 

. . . . 5 

24 

Philadelphia (Gross) 

... 25 

0 

Indianapolis (Landis) . . . 

. . . . <i 

25 

Vancouver (Patterson) . . . 

... 24 

7 

Salt Lake City (Walker) 

. . . 17 

26 

Portland (Powers) 

... 27 

s 


. 10 

27 



9 

Seattle (Edmond) 

. . . . 8 

28 

Pittsburgh (Cohn) 

. . . 29 

10 

Montreal (English) 

. 13 

29 

New Orleans (Landaiche) 

... 28 

11 

Dallas (Beiersdorf) 

. . . . 14 

30 

Buffalo (Samson) 

... 31 

12 

Boston (Callahan) 

. . 9 

31 

Winnipeg (Huber) 

. . . 30 

13 

Milwaukee (Lorentz) . . . 

... 7 

32 

New York (Buxbaum) . . . 

... 33 

14 

Oklahoma City (Clark) . . 

. . . . 12 

33 

Minneapolis (PodolofT) . . . 

... 32 

15 

St. Louis (Reingold) .... 

II 

34 

Des Moines (Mayer) 

... 34 

10 

Albany (Grassgreen) .... 

... 16 

35 

Omaha (Scott) 

. . . 35 

n 

Atlanta (Wilson) 

... 15 

36 

Charlotte (Longdon) 

... 36 

18 

Toronto (Bailey) 

. . 18 

37 

St. John (March) 

... 37 

19 

Denver (Morrison) 







DISTRICTS 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept 



30th 

District (Manager) 

23 rd 

30th 

District (Manager) 

23rd 

1 

Coast ( — ) 

l 

6 

Atlantic (Moss) 

7 

2 

Northeast (Bailey) 

... 2 

7 

South (Ballance) 

... 6 

3 

Great Lakes ( — ) 

... 3 

8 



4 

Midwest (Scott) 

... 4 

9 

Prairie (Levy) 

. . . 9 

5 

Canada (O’Loghlin) 






Sept. 

30th Division (Manager) 

1 West (K upper) . . . . 

2 Central (Geliring) 


DIVISIONS 

Sept. Sept. 

23rd 30th Division (Manager) 

• • . 1 3 East (Sussman) . . . 


Sept. 
23 rd 
. 3 


K-7 SHORTS DELIVERY 


Eight Weeks 


Following is the standing of all branches, districts and divisions on accumulated 
eight weeks’ delivery of short subjects against eight weeks’ quota, as of Sep- 
tember 23: 

BRANCHES 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

23 k 

Branch (Manager) 

16th 

23 k 

Branch (Manager) 

Kith 

1 

Washington (Wheeler) 

.... 1 

20 

Minneapolis (PodolofT) . . . . 

. . 28 

2 

Pittsburgh (Cohn) 


21 

Boston (Callahan) 

. . 15 

3 

Portland (Powers) 

.... 3 

*»•» 



4 

Atlanta (Wilson) 


23 



5 

St. Louis (Reingold) . . . 

.... 6 

24 

Indianapolis (Landis) 

. . 26 

6 

Montreal (English) 

. 14 

25 

New Orleans (Landaiche) . . 

22 

< 

Los Angeles (Dillon) 


26 

New York (Buxbaum) 

. . 20 

8 

Ioronto (Bailey) 

.... 7 

27 

Oklahoma City (Clark) . . . . 

27 

9 

Btillalo (Samson) 


28 

Cleveland (Sclimertz) 

OK 

10 

Des Moines (Mayer) . . . . 

. 9 

29 

New Haven (Simon) 

. . 24 


Denver (Morrison) 

.... 12 

30 

Chicago (Eekhardt) 

. . 32 

12 

Cincinnati (Grady) 

. . . . 8 

31 

Milwaukee (Lorentz) 

. . 31 

13 

Calgary (Skorey) 

. . 11 

32 

Omaha (Scott) 

. . 29 

11 

Winnipeg (Huber) 

.... 13 

33 

Charlotte (Longdon) 

. . 30 

15 

Philadelphia (Gross) . . . . 

. 10 

34 

Albany (Grassgreen) 

. . 33 

1 6 

San Francisco (Ballentine) 

. . . . 16 

35 

St. John (March) 

. . 34 

17 

Dallas (Beiersdorf) . . . 

. . 35 

36 


. . 37 

18 

Salt Lake City (Walker) 

17 

37 

Memphis (Young) 


19 

Kansas City (Fuller) . . . 

. . . . 21 





Sept. 

23rd District (Manager) 

1 Atlantic (Moss) . . . 

2 Coast ( — ) 

3 Midwest (Scott) 

1 Mideast (Roberts) 

5 Canada (O’Loghlin) 


DISTRICTS 

Sept. Sept. 

Kith 23rd District (Manager) 

• • • 1 6 Prairie (Levy) 

• • • 2 7 South (Itallance) . . . . 

4 8 Northeast (Bailey) . . 

• • • 3 9 Great Lakes ( — ) . . . 


Sept. 

10th 

8 

6 

. 9 


Sept. 

23rd Division (Manager) 

1 East (Sussman) . . . . 

2 West (Kupper) 


DIVISIONS 

Sept. Sept. 

Kith 23rd Division (Manager) 
• • • 1 3 Central (Gchring) 


Sept. 

10th 

3 


K-7 NEWS DELIVERY 


j 


Eight Weeks " 


Following is the standing of all branches, districts and divisions on accumulated 
eight weeks’ delivery on Movietone News against eight weeks’ quota, as of 
September 23 : 

BRANCHES 


Sept. Sept. 

23rd Branch (Manager) 10th 

1 Los Angeles (Dillon) 1 

2 Charlotte (Longdon) 2 

3 Philadelphia (Gross) 3 

4 Pittsburgh (Cohn) 4 

5 New York (Buxbaum) 7 

O San Francisco (Ballentine) ... 0 

7 Salt Lake City (Walker) 5 

8 Atlanta (Wilson) 9 

9 Winnipeg (Huber) 8 

10 St. Louis (Reingold) 10 

1L Minneapolis (PodolofT) 11 

12 Washington (Wheeler) 12 

13 Detroit (Sturm) 13 

14 Denver (Morrison) 15 

15 Cleveland (Sclimertz) 10 

10 Dallas (Beiersdorf) 19 

17 Cincinnati (Grady) 20 

18 New Haven (Simon) 17 

19 Vancouver (Patterson) 18 


Sept 


Sept, 

23 rd 

Branch (Manager) 

16th 

20 

New Orleans (Landaiche) 

. . . 14 

21 

Chicago (Eekhardt) 

22 

22 

Milwaukee (Lorentz) . . . . 

. . . 21 

23 

Seattle (Edmond) 

. . . 23 

24 

Indianapolis (Landis) . . . . 

. . . 25 

25 

Kansas City (Fuller) 

. . . 24 

26 

Boston (Callahan) 

... 26 

27 

Toronto (Bailey) 

... 27 

28 

Des Moines (Mayer) 

... 28 

29 

Memphis (Young) 

. . . 29 

30 

Montreal (English) 

. . . 30 

31 

Portland (Powers) 

. . . 32 

32 

Albany (Grassgreen) 

. . . 31 

33 

Calgary (Skorey) 

. . . 33 

3 l 

Buffalo (Samson) 

... 34 

35 

St. John (March) 

. . . 35 

36 

Oklahoma City (Clark) . . . 

. . . 36 

37 

Omaha (Scott) 

. . . 37 


Sept. 

23rd District (Manager) 

1 Coast ( — ) 

2 Atlantic (Moss) 

3 South (Ballance) 

4 Great Lakes ( — ) 

5 Mideast (Roberts) 


DISTRICTS 

Sept. Sept. 

l(»th 23rd District (Manager) 
• . . 1 O Prairie (Levy) .... 

... 2 7 Midwest (Scott) . . . 

. . . 3 8 Canada (O’Loghlin) 

... 4 9 Northeast (Bailey) 


Sept. 

10th 


O 

8 

9 


DIVISIONS 

Sept. Sept. I Sept. Sept. 

23rd Division (Manager) 10th I 23rd Division (Manager) lOtli 

1 West (Kupper) 1 3 Central (Gehring) 3 

2 East (Sussman) 2 I 



NEW DYNAMO 


5 


K-7 FEATURE SALES 


J 


Following is the standing of every branch, district and division on the sale of 
the 1939-40 (K-7) feature product, based on total contracts (including record 
franchises) sold, against total possibilities, as of October 3: 

BRANCHES 


Oct. Sept. 

3rd It ranch (Manager) 26th 

1 Pittsburgh (Cohn) 1 

2 Washington (Wheeler) 2 

3 Salt Lake City (Walker) 4 

I Memphis (Young) 3 

5 Dallas (Beiersdorf) 6 

6 Atlanta (Wilson) 5 

7 Philadelphia (Gross) 7 

Oklahoma City (Clark) 8 

St. Louis (Reingohl) 9 


10 Winnipeg (Huber) 10 

11 Charlotte (Longdon) 11 

12 Los Angeles (Dillon) 12 

13 San Francisco (Ballcntinc) ... 13 

14 Boston (Callahan) 19 

15 Minneapolis (Podolotr) 15 

1(5 Albany (Grassgreen) 11 

17 Indianapolis (Landis) 22 

18 Cleveland (Sell inert/.) 17 

19 Kansas City (Fuller) 16 

DISTRICTS 


Oet. Sept. 

3rd Branch (Manager) 26tli 

20 lies Moines (Mayer) 21 

21 Milwaukee (Lorentz) 18 

22 New Haven (Simon) 21 

23 Omaha (Scott) 23 

24 Cincinnati (Grady) 20 

25 Seattle (Edmond) 26 

26 Denver (Morrison) 25 

27 Portland (Powers) 27 

28 St. John (March) 30 

20 Buffalo (Samson) 28 


New Orleans (Landaichc) .... 29 

Detroit (Sturm) 31 

Toronto (Bailey) 32 

Vancouver (Patterson) 33 

Chicago (Eekhardt) 34 

New York (Buxbaum) 36 

36 Calgary (Skorey) 35 

37 Montreal (English) 


30 

31 

32 

33 
3 l 
35 


37 


Oct. 

3rd District (Manager) 

1 Atlantic (Moss) . . . 

2 South (Ballance) 

3 Midwest (Scott) 

4 Coast ( — ) 

5 Northeast (Bailey) 


Oet. 

3rd Division (Manager) 

1 West (Kupper) .... 

2 East (Sussman) . . . 


Sept. 

26th 

1 


Oet. 

3rd 

6 


District (Manager) 
Prairie (Levy) .... 
Mideast (Roberts) . 
Great Lakes ( — ) . . 
Canada (O’Loghlin) 


Sept. 

26th 

6 

8 

0 


DIVISIONS 

Sept. | Oct. Sept. 

26th 3rd Division (Manager) 26th 

, . . . 1 3 Central (Gehring) 3 


K-7 NEWS SALES 


i 


(K 


'allowing is the standing of 
7) Movietone News eontrae 


all branches, districts and divisions on total 1939-40 
ts sold against total possibilities, as of October 3: 


BRANCHES 


Oct. 

3rd 

1 

•> 

3 

I 


8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 
10 

Oct. 

3rd 

1 

3 

4 


Oet. 

3rd 

1 


Branch (Manager) 
Pittsburgh (Cohn) .... 
Washington (Wheeler) 
Cincinnati (Grady) . . . 
Memphis (Young) .... 
Philadelphia (Gross) . . 
Los Angeles (Dillon) . . 
Cleveland (Schmertz) . 
Atlanta (Wilson) .... 
New Haven (Simon) 
Charlotte (Longdon) . . 
Salt Lake City (Walker) 
Boston (Callahan) .... 
Albany (Grassgreen) 

San Francisco (Ballcntinc) 
Winnipeg (Huber) . . . 
Portland (Powers) . . 
Minneapolis ( Podolotr ) 
Indianapolis ( Landis) 

St. Louis (Reingold) 


Sept. 

26th 

1 


3 

1 

5 

6 
8 

16 

10 

12 

10 

11 

13 
!) 

14 

15 


Oet. 

3rd 

20 

21 

23 

21 


28 

29 

30 

3 1 

32 

33 

I 

35 

36 

37 


Branch (Manager) 
Kansas City (Fuller) . 
Dallas (Beiersdorf) . . 
Milwaukee ( Lorentz) 

Des Moines (Mayer) . . 
Seattle (Edmond) . . . 

P, ii llalo (Samson) . . . 
Oklahoma City (Clark) 

Omaha (Scott) 

Denver (Morrison) . . . 
New Orleans (Landaiche) 
New York (Bnxhaum) 
Chicago (Eekhardt) 

Detroit (Sturm) 

Montreal (English) . . 
Vancouver ( Patterson ) 
Toronto (Bailey) .... 

St. John (March) . . . 
Calgary (Skorey) .... 


Sept. 

26th 
. . 18 
. . 20 
. . 21 
. . 23 
. . 26 
. . 24 
. . 25 
. . 28 


DISTRICTS 


District (Manager) 
Atlantic (Moss) . . . 
Mideast (Roberts) 
Northeast (Bailey) 
South (Ballance) . . 
Coast ( — ) 


Sept. 

26th 

1 


Oet. 

3rd 

6 

8 

9 


District (Manager) 
Midwest (Scott) . . 
Prairie (Levy) .... 
Great Lakes ( — ) 
Canada (O’Loghlin) 


20 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 
37 

36 


Sept. 

26th 

6 


DIVISIONS 


Division (Manager) 
East (Sussman) . . . . 
West (Kupper) 


Sept. 

26th 

1 


Oet. Sept. 

3rd Division (Manager) 26th 

3 Central (Gehring) 3 


| K-7 SHORT SALES | 

Following is the standing of all branches, districts and divisions on sale of 
1030-40 Movietone short subjects product and Terry-Toon (K-7), based on 
contracts sold against possibilities, as of October 3: 

BRANCHES 


Oct 

3rd 

1 

3 

4 


8 
0 
10 
1 1 
12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 
10 

Oct. 

3rd 


Sept. 

Branch (Manager) 26th 

Pittsburgh (Cohn) 1 

Washington (Wheeler) 2 

Salt Lake City (Walker) 4 

Memphis (Young) 3 

Philadelphia (Gross) 5 

Dallas (Beiersdorf) 6 

St. Louis (Reingold) 7 

Oklahoma City (Clark) 8 

Los Angeles (Dillon) 13 

Charlotte (Longdon) 9 

Minneapolis (PodolofT) 11 

Albany (Grassgreen) 10 

Winnipeg (Huber) 12 

Atlanta (Wilson) 14 

Cleveland (Schmertz) 16 

San Francisco (Ballcntinc) ... 15 

Kansas City (Fuller) 17 

Milwaukee (Lorentz) 18 

Indianapolis (Landis) 21 


Oct. 

3rd 

20 

21 

22 

23 


28 

29 

30 

3 1 

32 

33 

34 

36 

37 


Sept. 

Branch (Manager) 26tli 

Cincinnati (Grady) 10 

Omaha (Scott) 20 

Seattle (Edmond) 23 

New Haven (Simon) 22 

Des Moines (Mayer) 27 

Boston (Callahan) 28 

Denver (Morrison) 24 

Portland (Powers) 26 

New Orleans (Landaiche) .... 25 

Detroit (Sturm) 29 

BufTalo (Samson) 30 

Calgary (Skorey) 31 

St. John (March) 33 

Chicago (Eekhardt) 32 

New York (Buxbaum) 35 

Montreal (English) 34 

Toronto (Bailey) 36 

Vancouver (Patterson) 37 


DISTRICTS 


Oct. 

3rd 

1 


District (Manager) 
Atlantic (Moss) . . . 
Midwest (Scott) . . 
South (Ballance) 

Coast ( — ) 

Prairie (Levy) .... 


Sept 
26th f 


Sept. I 


Oct. 

3rd District (Manager) 

6 Northeast (Bailey) 7 

7 Mideast (Roberts) 6 

8 Great Lakes ( — ) 8 

0 Canada (O’Loghlin) 0 


DIVISIONS 


Sept. 

Division (Manager) 26th 

West (Kupper) 1 

East (Sussman) 2 


Oct. Sept. 

3rd Division (Manager) 26th 

3 Central (Gehring) 3 


SELL! BOOK! COLLECT! 


WEEK’S SALES RUN 
AHEAD OF ’38 LAP! 


Philadelphians Prepared To Capitalize Big Opportunity 



Field Cheered As Wobber Approves Another 
Big Batch Of Deals And Sees Immediate 
Step-Up In Revenue For The Drive 


For the first time since K-7 selling started last Spring, the volume for a 
week ran ahead of the corresponding lap of 1938. 

That happened this week when Mr. Wobber approved what constituted the largest 
batch of K-7 contracts on which he has passed in three months. And this total was 
substantially in excess of the volume approved on K-6 during the corresponding week 
last season. 

In addition, the Contract Department was working on circuit contracts embracing 
several hundred other situations. These deals had been previously approved, but have 
not yet been entered in the K-7 sales register, according to Contract Manager 
Jack Bloom. 

Release of “The Rains Came” and trade showings on “Hollywood Cavalcade” have served as the 
greatest stimulant to date insofar as sales is concerned. 

Field reaction to Mr. Wobber’s approval of another big batch of propositions was extremely 
enthusiastic. This was evident from the enthusiasm with which district and branch managers, but 
mostly salesmen, wrote to this department in the past few days. 

That there will be an immediate improvement in weekly revenue as the result of the release of big 
pictures and approval of some 600 contracts in less than 10 days was the belief of the field. They 
substantiated this claim by directing attention to the substantial jump in their bookings. 

Outstanding performer continues to be Landis’ Indianapolis. The Hoosiers are gaining consistently 
in all departments. On K-7 feature sales status they advanced from 22nd to 17th place, but Cohn’s 
Pittsburghers still showed the way, some six points ahead of Wheeler’s Washington, with Walker’s Salt 
Lake Citians making rapid strides. The Mormons are now in third place, 1.6 behind Washington and 

1.1 stronger than Young’s Memphisans whom they vaulted. 

Callahan’s Bostonians are due for an even greater advance than they enjoyed this week. North- 
eastern District Manager Tom H. Bailey was in New York this week and returns to Boston with a 
healthy batch of deals okayed by Mr. Wobber. This week Boston’s status leaped to No. 15, a gain of 
four. It is now only one point behind Ballentine’s San Francisco. 

Mayer’s Des Moines, too, took on added strength and jumped from 24 to 20, within four-tenths of 
a mark of Kansas City, which dropped three, as did Milwaukee. March’s St. John and Buxbaum’s New 
York climbed two and one, respectively. 

Among the divisions and districts there were no changes in sales status. Moss’ Atlantic is still 
first, leading Ballance’s South this week by 8.5 points. Scott’s Midwest was 6.1 under South and 2.9 
above Coast which topped Bailey’sNortheast by 1.6. Levy’s Prairies follow, 1.3 under Northeast and 

5.2 ahead of Roberts’ Mideast. Great Lakes trailed the latter by 7.4 and led O’Loghlin’s Canada by 3.9. 

Kupper’s West is exactly nine points stronger than Sussman’s East and 17.1 above Gehring’s 

Centrals. 




6 


NEW DYNAMO 


“HOLLYWOOD” LAUNCHED ON 
RECORD-DYNAMITING CAREER 


EXHIBS AND CRITICS 
LOUD IN THEIR PRAISE 

“BEST TECHNICOLOR SMASH” 


THEATRE OPERATORS SAY IT 

WITH MAXIMUM PLAYTIME 


Continued from Page 3 

Pierre Boulogne, city manager 
for Wilmer & Vincent, Norfolk, 
Va., jotted down the following: 
“It’s in the bag. There’s one I 
don’t have to worry about!” 

Branch managers’ wires were 
followed up with batches of com- 
ments from exhibitors. Most 
managers invited local critics 
and these carried advance re- 
views that will play a big part 
in arousing interest in the pro- 
duction. 

Out of a total of 327 exhib- 
itors who made comparisons with 
other pictures, exactly 285 pre- 
dicted “Hollywood Cavalcade” 
would equal or better “Alexan- 
der’s Ragtime Band” business. 
The total represents exhibitors’ 
cards that had already reached 
the Home Office when New Dyna- 
mo went to press Friday. 

A total of 350 day-and-date 
engagements on “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” start next week-end. 
This is the largest day-and-date 
showing any release of this com- 
pany has ever enjoyed. 

In addition to Los Angeles 
and Cincinnati, “Hollywood Cav- 
alcade” was to open Friday in 
Philadelphia, Dallas and Hous- 
ton. 

Largest audience of trades- 
people at a preview was reported 
by B. B. Reingold of St. Louis. 
There some 750 showmen and 
others, including newspaper crit- 
ics, were in attendance. The lat- 
ter will carry reviews this week- 
end. 

As New Dynamo went to press 
clippings from trade papers and 
advance newspaper reviews were 
pouring into this department. 

While the Home Office hummed 
with enthusiasm over exhibitors’ 
reception of “Hollywood Caval- 
cade,” significant of this pro- 
duction’s box office potentialities 
were the reports of the audiences’ 
reaction it enjoyed in Los An- 
geles and Cincinnati. 

This week’s issue of Life car- 
ried and featured an eight-page 
pictorial resume of “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” selecting it as “the 
picture of the week.” This and 
other nationally circulated mag- 
azines this week carried an eye- 
catching, multi-colored full-page 
ad. 

The world premiere in Los 
Angeles on Wednesday night, 
incidentally, was this industry’s 
single observance and recogni- 
tion of the fact that Oct. 4 
marked the 50th anniversary of 
the invention that was to be uni- 
versally known as the motion 
picture. 

Variety, the weekly “bible of 
show business,” said: “There is 
box office lure and highly satis- 
factory entertainment. Film has 
an abundance of novelty and will 
be a strong contender in the 
early season lineup of attrac- 
tions and draught. Excellently 
produced and brightened by col- 
or, the film should score heavily 
in theatres of every type.” 

Following is the review pub- 
lished in Daily Variety, printed 
in Hollywood: 

“This introspective and essen- 
tially historical account of the 
birth and growth of the world’s 
greatest medium of entertain- 
ment is as fascinating and stir- 
ring as any outside drama the 
screen has projected. In ‘Holly- 
wood Cavalcade,’ a grandiose and 


nostalgic reminiscence of succes- 
sive phases of the motion picture 
industry, woven around a com- 
pelling heart interest story, Dar- 
ryl F. Zanuck and his aides have 
a hit show about film show busi- 
ness which is both monumental 
and commercial. Exhilarating, 
inspiring, it carries also a note 
of encouragement to picture pro- 
duction and exhibition personnel 
in these days when the industry 
faces, as it has faced before, a 
seemingly crucial period. 

“Fundamentally, ‘Hollywood 
Cavalcade’ is a splendidly con- 
ceived, acted, directed and pro- 
duced emotional drama. Alice 
Faye and Don Ameche carry 
f long a powerful love story with 
a sincerity and conviction neither 
has ever excelled. The intimate, 
personal drama dominates at all 
times. But behind and inextri- 
cably a part of this heart-interest 
narrative all the epochal high- 
lights, the awkward beginnings, 
the changing technique and the 
emergence of the film’s dominant 
figures are vividly depicted or 
suggested. To the older genera- 
tion of picturegoers the pie- 
throwing slapstick, the Mack 
Sennett bathing beauties, the 
Keystone Cops of the nickelodeon 
days will bring chuckles and 
perhaps a gulp, while to the 
younger generation these un- 
couth but bellylaugh comicalities 
will be an entertaining prelude 
to the coming of the talkies 
which they know. One of the im- 
pressively grand bits in the cav- 
alcade is a dignified and very 
touching toast to romance by 
Mack Sennett himself, looking 
very gallant as the genius-pro- 
ducer emeritus. 

“GREAT ACTING” 

“Alice Faye is portrayed as 
the first important stage star to 
turn to the flickers. Don Ameche 
is the ambitious prop boy who 
signs her up and becomes a great 
director, who rises and falls and 
rises again through the love 
these two bear each other after 
Alan Curtis, the leading man, has 
married Miss Faye and dies in an 
auto accident. 

“J. Edward Bromberg contrib- 
utes a remarkably fine perform- 
ance as the business manager 
whose heart outweighs his finan- 
cial monitorship in his emotional 
relationship with his friends, the 
star and the director. 

“Curtis carries his romantic 
assignment very effectively. Stu- 
art Erwin has a responsible part, 
well done, as an early camera- 
man. Donald Meek scores as the 
producer of early film efforts. 
Old timers recalling their early 
comic chores are Jed Prouty, 
Buster Keaton, Eddie Collins, 
Hank Mann, Heinie Conklin, 
James Finlayson, Ben Turpin, 
Chester Conklin. Many contribu- 
tary roles are excellently played 
in the long list of credits. 

“Irving Cummings’ direction is 
masterful, both in catching the 
nostalgic elements and in making 
the love story a powerfully stir- 
ring crux of the vivid and well 
paced narrative. Entertainment 
is constantly maintained, despite 
temptations to go afield in his- 
torical reminiscences. 

“Harry Joe Brown admirably 
and most competently handled 
the associate producer responsi- 
bilities under Darryl F. Zanuck, 


j At New Yorh Showing pV^sidenMv'T’ I 

j Michel and General Manager of Distribution Herman Wobber { 
j were among the Home Office officials who attended the New | 
j York trade showing of “Hollywood Cavalcade.” Eastern ! 

Division Manager William Sussman and Director of Adver- j 
I tising. Publicity and Exploitation Charles E. McCarthy also j 
• were present. 



giving the show splendid presen- 
tation and importance. Screen 
play is commendable screen craft 
and a credit to Ernest Pascal, 
with Hilary Lynn and Brown 
Holmes sharing story credits and 
Lou Breslow getting the original 
idea honor. 

“Picture is one of the finest 
examples of Technicolor magnifi- 
cence. Allen M. Davey did the 
color camera work, and Ernest 
Palmer wielded the dramatic 
camera. Art direction and set- 
tings are exceptionally lavish but 
in best taste, as are the costumes. 

“An outstanding emotional 
scene is in the advent of sound, 
when A1 Jolson sings his ‘Col 
Nidre’ for the ‘Jazz Singer.’ 
Notable figures of the industry, 
directors, stars, producers, the 
genius personalities of the indus- 
try are plainly suggested, if not 
named by name. The anxieties, 
the tragedies, the triumphs, the 
antagonisms and cooperations 
which went into the beginnings 
and the establishment of the mo- 
tion picture colossus are remark- 
ably combined to make this a 
great and memorable show.” 

FILM DAILY 

Here is what the ace critic for 
Film Daily had to say: 

“Smash box office attraction 
with a brilliant cavalcade of film 
history, superbly projected to 
screen. 

“Hollywood here holds up the 
mirror to itself as never before 
and the result is absorbing, 
thrilling romance for audiences 
everywhere and, for exhibitors, 
not merely ‘pay dirt’ but a vein 
of purest ore. As entertainment, 
it can’t miss; and as a chronicle 
of the film’s rise from low to high 
estate, it is faithful to the essen- 
tials however they may have 
been adapted to serve the needs 
of the swell Hilary Lynn-Brown 


Holmes story and the equally 
swell Ernest Pascal screenplay. 
There is nostalgic footage a- 
plenty for woven into the roman- 
tic fabric is the ‘bii'th’ of the 
custard pie and Keystone Cop 
slapstick, the advent of the bath- 
ing beauty school of cinema, the 
‘discovery’ of the De Millean 
type of spectacle and, finally, the 
debut of sound by way of A1 Jol- 
son and ‘The Jazz Singer.’ And, 
being candid about it, while Alice 
Faye as Molly Adair, star, and 
Don Ameche as Director Michael 
Linnett Connors play effectively 
upon the heartstrings, turning in 
outstanding performances, the 
picture’s socko ‘punch’ is found 
when it frankly reverts to the 
screen’s elementals. The re-en- 
actment of a Keystone Cop 
comedy, with Miss Faye as the 
heroine, supported by Jed Prouty, 
Buster Keaton, Eddie Collins, 
Hank Mann, Heinie Conklin and 
James Finlayson, will have ’em 
rolling in the aisles. 

“You see this equivalent of a 
two-reeler in black and white 
and there is similar resort to it 
for plausibility’s sake on occa- 
sion. Otherwise, the film is in 
Technicolor, and what Techni- 
color! Corking camera work can- 
not but add to the professional 
stature of Allen M. Davey and 
Ernest Palmer. And while on 
the subject of credits, generous 
commendation to Harry Joe 
Brown, associate producer, and 
Irving Cummings, director. By 
virtue of background adn experi- 
ence, both were ideal selections 
for this assignment. Cummings 
has created a well nigh perfect 
illusion and, additionally, carries 
the story briskly forward with 
no let-down in suspense and in- 
terest. And the comedy scenes, 
slapstick and otherwise, are 
wows. 


350 

OPENINGS FOR 

NEXT WEEK 

Meantime, “Rain” 
Continues Big- 
Generally 

Miss Faye is an ideal Molly. 
No torch singer here, she turns 
in a deft and sympathetic char- 
acterization. And, physically, it 
is a punishing role; after all, 
slapstick IS slapstick. Ameche, 
too, giyes more than a surface 
performance, and is certain to 
add to his following. Bromberg’s 
Spingold is another gem, and 
another to shine is Stuart Erwin 
as Ameche’s cameraman. The 
trade will get a kick out of Hicks’ 
banker. The parade of veterans 
— Mack Sennett, Lee Duncan, 
Ben Turpin, Chester Conklin, 
among them — heightens the au- 
thenticity. Finally, there’s a fit- 
ting musical setting, directed by 
Louis Silvers. 

Direction, aces. Photography, 
brilliant.” 

M. P. DAILY 

Following is a classic, in the 
line of reviews, printed by Mo- 
tion Picture Daily: 

“ ‘Hollywood Cavalcade,’ with 
no pretensions at authenticity al- 
though much of it is reminiscent 
of the record, is an all-around 
swell show. Darryl F. Zanuck’s 
production staff has packed ter- 
rific audience appeal in sequences 
that are in turn hilarious, dra- 
matic, tender and moving. Dyed- 
in-the-wool fans will find in it 
much to rave about. It is the 
type of show for which showmen 
can pull all the stops in doing 
a selling job. 

“Those who have been follow- 
ing the fortunes of the industry 
for some years will feel a glow 
of recognition in names, situa- 
tions, incidents and scenes which 
are part of the industry’s his- 
tory, before and back of the 
camera. For every type of audi- 
ence there is a bitter-sweet ro- 
mance and an intelligent insight 
into the business of making 
motion pictures. 

“Don Ameche and Alice Faye 
do remarkably well in the pivotal 
roles of Michael Linnett Connors 
and Molly Adair. Connors is a 
brilliant but erratic director who 
discovers her on Broadway, 
takes her to Hollywood and 
builds her by degrees to the peak 
of cinema fame. This was in the 
days when Hollywood was still 
in cocoon, in the days when nick- 
elodeons began to dot the land- 
scape. 

“Irving Cummings does an ex- 
pert job of directing a large and 
well remembered cast which in- 
cludes players who reenact se- 
quences of early day films. Stuart 
Erwin is a cameraman, Buster 
Keaton plays himself, Jed Prouty 
is the chief of the Keystone cops, 
and there are Ben Turpin, Ches- 
ter Conklin, Mack Sennett and a 
host of others. 

“Harry Joe Brown was asso- 
ciate producer of the picture 
which was based on an idea by 
Lou Breslow. Ernest Pascal’s 
screenplay, from the story by 
Hilary Lynn and Brown Holmes, 
shows great understanding. The 
projection of films in black and 
white in contrast to the color of 
the picture is most effective. 
Allen M. Davey and Ernest 
Palmer did fine camera work.” 




NEW DYNAMO 


7 


WOBBER REITERATES BRIVE 
PLEDG E TO THE C OMPANY! 

Follows Up Personal Letters Of Appraisal To Branch Managers 
With Move Mirroring His Confidence In Field’s Ability! 


General Manager of Distribution Herman Wobber Friday informed Messrs. Kent and Schenck in New York that his field 
force will in the second half of the Drive not only absorb the defi cit of the first half, but deliver a revenue that at the end of the 
campaign will show a return equal to the stipulated 18-week quota. 

He reiterated his statement of confidence in the field's ability to hit its set figure as a climax to a week marked by a succession of moves that left 
no doubt that the second half of the Drive will be the rip-roaringest affair in company history. 

He broadcast personal letters to all district and branch managers in which he frankly outlined to them exactly what their offices must do in the 

1 remaining weeks of the Drive. These letters were sent out 


COAST 

KEEPS TEASING 

ITS RIVALS 

A comparison of 
Drive delivery to date 
with advance rentals 
indicates a battle royal 
among the Coast, Mid- 
west, South, Atlantic 
and Lakes. 

Washington continues to 
be the Coast’s most stub- 
born opponent, as well as 
most dangerous. 

But, Midwestern and Southern 
offices threaten not only the 
Pacifies, but the Washingtonians, 
as well. Every Dixie office, ex- 
cept Charlotte, has been consis- 
tently stepping up on advance, 
according to the official returns. 

Coast, though, remains strong, 
with Los Angeles, Salt Lake 
City and San Francisco ranking 
exceptionally strong today and 
in promise of future delivery. 

Longest place jump on ad- 
vance since the first listing was 
made by Tom Young’s Memphis 
which upped 17. Salt Lake gained 
seven places and Dallas, gained 
six. 


j 


i 


SALESMEN WHO LEAD BRANCHES ON 
DRIVE TOTAL DELIVERY AND ADVANCE 


Delivery 

Sliter 

Laseter 

Alexander 


Branch 
Albany 
Atlanta 
Boston 

Buffalo Kempner 

Charlotte Holst on 

Chicago Grohe 

Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Dallas 
Denver 

Des Moines 

Detroit 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 
Los Angeles 

Memphis 

Milwaukee 

Minneapolis 
New Haven 


Bugie 

Lichter 

Miller 

Paulson 

O’Neil 

Westcott 

Neger 

Ivubitzki 

Wall 

Wyse 

Edgerton 

Mussman 

Wright 


New Orleans Shallcross 

New York Blumstein 

Oklahoma City James 

Omaha Ironfield 

Philadelphia Tolmas 

Pittsburgh Interrante 

Portland Robinette 

St. Louis Williams 

Salt Lake City Dugan 

San Francisco Erickson 

Seattle Spear 

Washington Norris 


Advance 
Sliter 
Laseter 
Alexander 
Dickman 
Holston 
Grohe 
llurkart 
Lichter 
Miller 
Rennie 
O’Neil 
Westcott 
McCleaster 
Ivinser 
Robison 
Wyse 
Edgerton 
Mussman 
Wright 
Shallcross 
Blumstein 
James 
Ironfield 
Tolmas 
Interrante 
Robinette 
Williams 
Tidwell 
Bernard 
Spear 
Norris 




I 


Week-To-Week Summary Of Branches’ 

Dri ve Delivery And Advance Moves 


ADVANCE RENTALS 

NATIONAL GROUP 


Atlanta 7 

Huston 16 

BnH'alo 15 

Chicago 3 

Cincinnati ... 11 

Cleveland .... 12 

Dallas 5 

Detroit 13 


Aug. Aug. Aug. 
12th 19th 26th 


Sept. Sept. 
2nd 9th 


Indianapolis . . 
Kansas City . . 
Los Angeles . . 
Minneapolis . . 
New York . . . 
Philadelphia .. 
Pittsburgh . . . 
St. Louis . . . . 
San Francisco . 
Washington . . 


9 

I 

I I 
10 
18 
I 7 

6 

•» 

.s 

l 


13 

15 
1 
9 

11 

5 

16 
10 

12 

8 

18 

17 

6 

3 
11 

4 


15 
12 

3 

JO 

11 

16 
11 

6 

13 

8 

18 

17 


14 
16 

5 
J) 

15 

6 
12 
10 

13 

8 

18 

17 

4 

11 

3 


14 

15 

5 
9 

16 

6 
11 
12 

3 
13 

8 

18 

17 

4 

10 

1 


Sept. 
1 6th 


16 

14 


6 

10 

12 

13 

8 

18 

17 

4 

3 

9 

I 


Sept.. Sept. 
23rd 30th 


TOTAL DELIVERY 

NATIONAL GROUP 


6 

14 

15 

5 

12 

16 

11 

10 

3 

13 

8 

18 

17 


6 

13 
16 

7 

14 

15 
4 

11 

s 

3 

12 

9 

18 


10 

I 


Atlanta 

Boston 

Buffalo 
Chicago . . . . 
Cincinnati 
Cleveland . . . 

Dallas 

Detroit 

Indianapolis . 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles . 
Minneapolis . 
New York . . 
Philadelphia . 
Pittsburgh . . 
St. Louis . . . 
San Francisco 


1st 

Week 

J1 

. 10 
. 18 


13 
12 

6 

8 

1 

15 

I 7 

14 

IG 

II 


2nd 

Week 


16 

3 

8 

13 
10 
12 

6 
1 1 
1 

15 

18 

14 


3rd 

Week 

8 

16 

6 

10 

14 

9 

12 

3 

11 

1 


13 

18 


4th 

Week 

5 

6 

17 
9 

10 

13 

8 

11 

3 

12 

l 

15 

18 

14 

16 


5th 

Week 


18 

J) 

10 

14 
6 

1 1 

4 

12 

1 

15 

16 
13 

8 

3 


6th 

Week 

5 

9 

18 

10 

11 

16 


12 

I 

I I 
15 
13 
I 7 
G 

3 


7th 

Week 

5 
10 
18 

8 

11 

17 

6 

4 

12 

1 

15 
14 
13 

16 
9 
3 


INTERNATIONAL 

GROUP 



INTERNATIONAL 

GROUP 



Auk. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 


1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 

5th 

6th 

7th 


12th 

19th 

26th 

2nd 

9 th 

16th 

23 rd 

30th 

\ 

reek 

Week 

Week 

Week Week 

Week 

Week 

Albany 

11 

10 

11 

12 

13 

12 

12 

13 

Albany .... 

3 

2 

3 

4 

5 

7 

8 

Charlotte . . . 

15 

16 

17 

13 

1 1 

15 

14 

14 

Charlotte . . . 

13 

16 

15 

15 

15 

16 

14 

Denver 

7 

7 

7 

7 

4 

5 

6 

5 

Denver 

4 

5 

<; 

6 

10 

10 

11 

Des Moines . 

16 

1 5 

16 

16 

15 

16 

16 

16 

Des Moines .. 

15 

14 

1 6 

17 

18 

17 

17 

Memphis . . . 

10 

11 

10 

8 

7 

9 

7 

8 

Memphis . . . 

19 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

Milwaukee . . 

17 

17 

14 

11 

9 

10 

10 

10 

Milwaukee . . 

5 

3 

j> 

1 

1 

•» 

»> 

New Haven . 

3 

3 

4 

1 

6 

8 

9 

9 

New Haven . 

1 

1 

1 

2 

o 

1 

1 

New Orleans 

6 

6 

5 

6 

8 

1 

3 

3 

New Orleans . 

9 

G 

5 

3 

3 

6 

5 

Oklahoma Cit.\ 

1 

1 

l 

1 

•> 

2 

1 

1 

Oklahoma . . 

*» 

8 

8 

Jl 

11 

Jl 

Jl 

Omaha 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

Omaha 

14 

18 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

Portland . . . 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

Portland . . . 

7 

1 0 

14 

14 

14 

14 

13 

Salt Lake City 

5 

4 

3 

3 

1 

2 


2 

Salt Lake City 

10 

Jl 

J) 

11 

6 

4 

3 

Seattle 

14 

14 

15 

16 

17 

17 

17 

17 

Seattle 

6 

4 

4 

5 

4 

5 

4 

Calgary 

4 

5 

6 

5 

5 

6 

5 

7 

Calgary .... 

12 

13 

11 

7 

8 

3 

G 

Montreal . . . 

13 

13 

13 

15 

11 

1 1 

1 1 

11 

Montreal . . . 

8 

7 

7 

8 

9 

11 

10 

St. John .... 

9 

9 

8 

9 

10 

7 

8 

6 

St. John .... 

18 

19 

18 

18 

17 

18 

18 

Toronto 

2 

•> 

•» 

•> 

3 

4 

4 

4 

Toronto .... 

11 

11 

10 

10 

7 

8 

7 

\ ancouver . . 

12 

12 

12 

14 

16 

14 

13 

12 

Vancouver . . 

16 

17 

17 

16 

16 

15 

16 

Winnipeg . . . 

8 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

15 

15 

Winnipeg . . . 

17 

15 

13 

13 

13 

13 

15 


after he had made a personal analysis of every office’s 
report on estimated advance rentals. 

Fully appreciative of the field’s vigorous efforts to maxi- 
mize revenue, Mr. Wobber stated that he will continue to 
make a personal weekly analysis of all branches’ and sales- 
men’s reports. 

He is particularly anxious that the field effect an immediate 
improvement in the booking situation, which, while not as healthy 
as last year, is the key to the suc cess of the Drive. 

Realizing that the field and ex- 
hibitors are fully aware of the 
superiority of the product, the 


sales 

chief 


is now 

dig- 


i n g 

i n to 

kSBi 3 

r 

the Dr ive 
with the 

same 

con- 


structive an- 

m m 

alysis 

that 

SS-J 

jar 



Herman Wobber 


marked his 
lead ership 
of the first 
two c a m - 
paigns. H e 
is confident 
that w ith 
“The Rains 
Came” and 
others now 
rolling and 
“Hollywood 
Cavalcade” 

started, plus increasing speed in 
sale of unclosed situations, the 
Drive’s prospects are brighter 
than ever. 

HIS ANALYSIS 

Following conferences with 
Messrs. Kent and Schenck this 
week-end and next week, Mr. 
Wobber expects to be able to 
head for the Coast, preparatory 
to making some of the larger 
branches during the third Drive 
tr'n. 

That a general speedup of 
bookings will substantially en- 
rich future weeks Mr. Wobber 
ascertained after comparing ter- 
ritorial standings on delivery 
with sales. 

He complimented branches 
that have been re-issuing past 
hits in a manner that has kept 
“extra” revenue maintaining a 
steady stream. 

In the field this week there 
was greater enthusiasm than at 
any other time in the Drive. This 
resulted largely from exhibitors’ 
reaction to “Hollywood Caval- 
cade.” 

To enable the field generally 
to increase its earning power the 
sales chief this week worked 
overtime passing on a batch of 
important deals. 

He personally found basis for 
his optimiism in reports that led 
him to believe that the Drive’s 
eighth week’s delivery would ex- 
ceed that of the corresponding 
period last year. 

From their offices the Division 
Managers received information 
that prompted Mr. Wobber to i-e- 
iterate the departmental pledge 
of 100 per cent delivery to 
Messrs. Kent and Schenck. 

The division pilots instructed 
their managers to “cut loose with 
any ‘kitty’ you may have.” How- 



IWIVE 


s 
!> 
Ml 
I I 


15 

16 

IS 

I!) 

•iO 

•Jl 


28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 


36 

16 

23 


6 

9 

28 

21 

8 


34 
18 

3 

31 
10 

32 

35 
12 

1 

14 

30 

20 

37 

29 

33 


K-7 

Branch Sales 

Oklahoma City 8 

Salt Lake City 3 

Washington 2 

New Orleans 30 

Toronto 32 

St. Louis j) 

Denver 26 

St. John 28 

Calgary 36 

Kansas City 19 

Memphis 4 

New Haven 22 

Milwaukee 21 

Dallas 3 

Pittsburgh 1 

Montreal 37 

Atlanta <; 

Chicago 34 

Indianapolis 47 

Minneapolis 15 

Vancouver 33 

Albany 

San Francisco 13 

Charlotte 1 1 

Detroit 31 

Winnipeg 10 

Des Moines 20 

Seattle 25 

Los Angeles 12 

Boston 44 

Portland 27 

Cincinnati 24 

Omaha 23 

Cleveland i« 

Buffalo 29 

Philadelphia 7 

New York City 35 


any 


ever, few, if any branches, have 
been able to accumulate 
“kitty” in this Drive. 

An analysis of branches’ 
standings on a Drive delivery 
and advance and on K-7 sales 
status shows that of the top 15 
offices whose advance rentals 
rank highest against 18-week 
quota, only seven are to be found 
in the corresponding group on 
circulation so far written on the 
1939-40 product. Best compara- 
tive showing continues to be 
made by Washington, which is 
second on sales, second on accu- 
mulated delivery among the 
Nationals and first in the latter 
category on advance rentals. 

Pittsburgh, first on sales, is 
showing improvement as are 
Dallas, Atlanta, Memphis and 
St. Louis. Oklahoma City, and 
Salt Lake City l’ank high in 
every calculation.. Philadelphia, 
on the other hand, is seventh on 
sales, but 36th on advance de- 
partmentally. In contrast, New 
Orleans and Toronto, 30th and 
32nd, respectively, on sales are 
departmentally fourth and fifth 
on advance. 



8 


NEW DYNAMO 



Published In The United States Every I Peek In The Interest Of Sales 
Promotion By The Distribution Department Oj 

20TH CENTURY— FOX FILM CORPORATION 

SIDNEY R. KENT, President 

HERMAN WOBBER, General Manager oj Distribution 


Roger Ferri 


Editor 



SALISOMLS 


sm 




N EXT to newspaper advertis- . 

ing, the most profitable 
means of arousing interest in 
coming attractions is the screen | 
trailer. And our own studio su- j 
pervises the trailers on our pic- 
tures. No home-made trailer 
can compare in either quality or 
selling strength with the trailer 
we release through National 
Screen. And the smart exhibi- 
tor need not be told which trailer 
serves his box office to best ad- 
vantage. 

• 

T HE finest performance Alice 
Faye and Don Ameche have 
ever given they present in “Hol- 
lywood Cavalcade.” That is the 
opinion of all who have seen this 
production. A finer collection of 
individual performances no pic- 
ture has boasted. That goes for 
the entire cast. J. Edward Brom- 
berg’s characterization of Dave 
Spingold is as masterly as the 
portrayal of the sheik in “Suez.” 

• 


thoroughly adsales-minded film 
salesmen. 

• 

T ODAY more than ever it is 
imperative to sell and book 
with foresight. Today condi- 
tions over here are better than 
they have been in two years. 
And they will continue to get 
better, according to official re- 
ports. America seems to be in 
for its greatest prosperity in 
years. Bear that in mind when 
selling and booking, states Mr. 
Wobber. 

• 

W HAT is the value of your 
contracts ? You’ll get the an- 
swer in the delivery standings. 
There is no secret in making 
contracts earn their maximum. 
It’s just a question of proper 
liquidation. Revenue from re- 
issues is important in that it is 
“extra” money, but keeping an 
eye on booking of available re- 
leases keeps your house in order. 



H OLLYWOOD’S concern over 
revenue is a healthy sign. It 
indicates, beyond a doubt, that 
Hollywood is 
distribution- 
mi n d e d and 
watching every 
d o liar. That 
should be as 
good news to 
exhibitors as it 
is to distribu- 
tors. In sales- 
mindedness our 
studio leads; 
there is no con- 
dition in any 
territory that 
is not taken Ed Thor gers e n 
into c a retul 
cons ideration 

by Hollywood today! Now, if 
only distributors and exhibitors 
were as mindful of Hollywood 
problems — what a greater in- 
dustry this would be! 




Y OUR attention is directed to 
the sales movements of two 
offices from whom you will hear 
much in the near future: Boston 
and Indianapolis. They advanced 
five places each on K-7 sales. 
Both have fed strongly into their I 
advance for the Drive and our 
guess is that they will be hard to j 
keep out of “the money.” 

• 

W HO’S afraid of the big bad | 
bombers?” asked a New 
York newspaper the other day. 
Our answer is: not theatregoers, 
for revenue in England and 
France took a decided jump. But, 
while revenue there is much 
nearer the normal expectancy, 
the fact remains that war restric- 
tions forbid the transfer of funds 
out of the country. 


T HE latest figures on sales- 
men’s contribution to adsales 
delivery are most encouraging. 
Twenty-one salesmen have sold 
at least 20 per cent of their re- 
spective total adsales’ deliveries. 
That is further proof that we 
now have an aggregation of 


S O impressed have been many 
critics by “Hollywood Caval- 
cade” that many of them this 
week rushed into print with help- 
ful and certainly ticket-selling 
advance reviews on this produc- 
tion. At least 37 such instances 
were reported to this publication 
and wisely key city exhibitors are 
capitalizing these reviews by ad- 
vertising quotations from them. 

• 

A YEAR ago at this time 17 
salesmen could boast an ad- 
vance plus delivery equal to 
their 18-week’s Drive total de- 
livery quota. And the product 
available then was nowhere near 
as good as it is today. But, 
frankly enthusiasm was seem- 
ingly greater. Let’s have more 
enthusiasm — and less sob-sing- 
ing and you’ll get the same 
“kick” out of this Drive that you 
enjoyed in prior Drives. You’ve 
got PLENTY about which to 
cheer today — more than ever be- 
fore! 

• 

O NE can’t help be inspired, for 
instance, by the truly great 
spirit in Harry Ballance’s South. 
There is a GREAT family! The 
family spirit dominates every- 
thing Harry’s offices do — and 
that is one of many reasons why 
we expect the Southern branches 
to be right up there among the 
Drive headliners. Yes, we’ll bet 
on that! 

• 

E D THORGERSEN’s Sports 
Reviews are becoming as 
popular as Vyvyan Donner’s 
Fashion Forecasts — and that’s 
saying that the former series has 
developed a permanent follow- 
ing. What the sports page is to 
the daily newspaper Thorger- 
sen’s Movietone News sports 
comments and Sports Reviews 
are to successful theatre opera- 
tion. His “Clocking the Jockeys” 
is a grand piece of entertain- 
ment! 


ATLANTA OVERLOOKS NO BET! 


From Paul Wilson’s alert branch comes this self-explanatory j 
! and interesting note: 

I “We have noticed in some of the past issues of New Dynamo \ 

: your mention of the outstanding business which Kansas City, j 
I Oklahoma City, St. Louis and some other branches have done 2 
j on ‘Jesse James.’ I don’t know how our record will compare | 

| with these exchanges; however, I would like to quote the fol- | 

! lowing figures insofar as Atlanta is concerned: 
j "On the K-6 season we sold 520 accounts and on ‘Jesse ! 
j James,’ for 31 weeks, through the week ending September 2, { 

' we had played 749 engagements. The grosses which we have j j 
I received are naturally larger than on any production we have = 

| ever handled in this territory. On ‘Alexander’s Ragtime Band’ I 
= for 54 weeks, also through to the week ending Sept. 2, we had | 
j served 732 bookings. We, of course, have quite a number of = 
j additional bookings coming up and on ‘Jesse James’ our book- j 
: ings are still heavy through the middle of November.” 



THIS WEEK 



A TLANTA’S salesmen are burning the midnight oil aplenty — and 
displaying the enterprise that made a champion of Paul Wil- 
son’s office in two successive Drives. For instance, Salesman Roland 
Fairchild closed a K-7 deal with the Starr circuit of colored situa- 
tions which this company had not served since the K-3 season. 


0 


KLAHOMA CITY continues to get a neat sum of extra coin 
on re-issues. According to word from there, last week Charles 
Clark’s office secured 19 repeat 



runs on “Jesse James, which has 
been extremely active in that ter- 


ritory during the Drive. 


TRA COHN’S Pittsburgh advises 

Jf I 

A that since “The Rains Came” 

■P*"t m- 

was released “our business has in- 

creased 30 per cent.” The past 


three weeks’ revenue does not bear 

Jir 

that out, Pittsburgh, but if you 

sav so, we’ll take your word for 


it — and watch the bigger weeks 
we know you will deliver. 

JM 


R. Fairchild 


T OM YOUNG’S Memphis, too, is 

■ 


Joe Flanagan 


\ A picking up a lot of loose coin. 

Tom himself lined up for some 45 repeat runs none other than the 
territory’s biggest source of revenue, the Robb & Rowley circuit. 
And it’s a very chunky amount of extra gelt the Memphis man- 
ager’s deal will bring the office. 

• 

E NLISTMENT in Canada is confined to volunteers at present. 

But, business in the large situations is better than it has been 
since last Spring. For instance, after playing three big weeks in 
Montreal, “Stanley and Livingstone” followed through with great 
grosses in Quebec, Three Rivers and Hull, in Ed English’s territory. 

• 

B UT, along comes “The Rains Came,” reports Montreal’s Jim 
Pearson, and that picturization of a best seller not only out- 
grosses “Stanley and Livingstone,” but it has given Montreal’s 
Palace theatre the biggest business that house has done in many, 
many months. # 

H OLLYWOOD CAVALCADE” is the World’s series opposition 
in Cincinnati this week-end, the Technicolor special opening 
there on Thursday. It was the first public showing of this Zanuck 
triumph east of Los Angeles, where the world premiere was held 
Wednesday night. # 

B EST individual “feed” into the Drive advance in the past month 
came from Phil Longdon’s Charlotte branch. And smart sales- 
men will do well not to overlook 
Charlotte’s Ebersole, Holston and 
Mock in this Big Push! 

• 

T HE finest 24-sheet Jerry Novat 
has turned out to date is the 
one we just saw on “Drums 
Along the Mohawk.” Pictorially 
it is an eye-catcher that sells 
everything at a single glance! 

Our posters are the best in the 
business. And you can shout that 
to the whole world. 

• 

Sam Germaine /CONGRATULATIONS to Harry j E Holston 
vy Brand, studio publicity direc- 
tor, on the manner in which the world premiere of “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” was handled and run off. It was Hollywood’s most his- 
toric premiere — and handled in a manner befitting the importance 
of the production and the occasion, according to the observations 
of the newspaper men in Los Angeles. 

• 

M R. ZANUCK has cast all roles for “The Grapes of Wrath.” And 
from what we gather at least three of the lucky players will 
come out of that picture with an increased box office value. 

• 

M ARY HEALY, ex-New Orleans secretary, plays a non-singing 
role in “20,000 Men a Year,” but this week she signed a new 
contract with Brunswicke to make four more recordings within the 
next two months. She recorded four tunes from “Second Fiddle” 
for that firm. 

• 

S ALT LAKE CITY’S jump from 17th to seventh place on accumu- 
lated nine-weeks’ delivery gives you an idea of the superior job 
Charles Walker’s office did last week when it was the only exchange 
to beat quota! 




The Latest 

i shop j 

ITALK | 

Comment * 

E LEVEN productions were in 
work at the beginning of this 
week. They were: “The Grapes 
of Wrath,” “He Married His 
Wife,” “Swanee River,” “The 
Blue Bird,” “Daytime Wife,” 
“Everything Happens at Night,” 
“Little Old New York,” “The Ad- 
venturer,” “The City,” “The Man 
Who Wouldn’t Talk” and “20,000 
Men a Year.” 

• 

P RINTS on “The Road to 
Glory” and “The First World 
War” will be in all exchanges by 
the time the accessories on those 
productions reach there. Mr. 
Wobber is hopeful that every 
branch will get early bookings 
on these re-issues. Meantime, he 
is studying the bookings on 
Grade Field’s “Shipyard Sally,” 
prints on which already are at 
the branches. 

• 

D ELL GOODMAN’S Far East 
is not only leading the Over- 
seas forces on Drive business, 
and on accumulated 39 weeks’ 
delivery, but the record shows 
that his division has registered 
the highest percentage of gain 
over the corresponding period of 
1938. His division’s increase 
tops that of Europe by 5.64 per 
cent, according to latest figures. 
• 

H ERE’S a prediction: Eddie 
Collins will emerge from 
“The Blue Bird” one of the 
screen’s outstanding comedians, 
following up a particularly 
funny portrayal as one of the 
Keystone Kops in “Hollywood 
Cavalcade.” That’s the tip that 
comes from a reliable source at 
the studio. 

• 

U P UNTIL now Salt Lake 
City’s Tidwell and Dugan 
have been having things very 
much their own way there, but 
word from there urges us to 
“keep an eye on McElhinney and 
Hallstrom.” But in money fed 
into the advance “Bishop” Tid- 
well in the past four weeks has 
secured far greater results than 
the other three salesmen at 
Walker’s branch. 

• 

T HINGS are humming as never 
before down at Sam Gross’ 
Philadelphia. The next 10 weeks 
will be the best that office has 
enjoyed — and bookings are right 
on top of release. As a matter 
of fact, reports from all the large 
territories indicate the second 
half of this Drive will be an his- 
toric affair — and the returns will 
surprise many! 

• 

L OS ANGELES’ Robison and 
Wall are making promising 
headway. In fact. Jack Dillon’s 
office, as a whole, faces a future 
that will subject rivals for the 
Nationals’ Drive championship 
to the full limit. But, it is ap- 
parent that this is not frighten- 
ing Washington, San Francisco, 
Indianapolis, Detroit, Cincinnati, 
Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas or 
Boston. 

• 

I T WILL interest his rivals to 
know that in the past four 
weeks, Paul Shallcross, New Or- 
leans salesman, fed something 
like 25 per cent of his total 18- 
weeks’ Drive quota into the ad- 
vance. Nearest to that figure 
came another Southerner, Zeke 
Miller, who is on his way to 
establish new earnings records 
in his zone. 

B ILL KUPPER has developed 
into the industry’s No. 1 
“flying division manager.” In the 
past four months he has flown 
something like 38,000 miles. 
This week he flew out to Denver 
and from there he continued on 
to Los Angeles, but he flies back 
to New York this coming week- 
end, totalling something like 
6,450 miles in a single w'eek- 




NEW DYNAMO 


9 


SIDELIGHTS 


T HE so-called smaller branches that more or less 
monopolized Kent Drive prizes in past years loom 
the strongest in potential earning power for the 
remainder of the Drive. But, in actual percentage of 
departmenal revenue earned so far in this Drive, the 
larger offices still are out front. Here is how the 37 
branches stack up on departmental delivery for the 
first seven weeks of this Drive, regardless of group 
affiliation: 


1 

Los Angeles 

13 

St. Louis 

20 

New Y r ork 

•» 

Washington 

14 

Boston 

27 

Minneapolis 

3 

San Francisco 

15 

New Orleans 

28 

Pittsburgh 

1 

Indianapolis 

10 

Calgary 

29 

Cleveland 

5 

New Haven 

17 

Toronto 

30 

Portland 

6 

Milwaukee 

18 

Albany 

31 

Charlotte 

7 

Salt Lake 

19 

Oklahoma 

32 

Winnipeg 

8 

Atlanta 

20 

Cincinnati 

33 

Buffalo 

!» 

Dallas 

21 

Montreal 

34 

Vancouver 

JO 

Detroit 

*>o 

Denver 

35 

Des Moines 

1 1 

Chicago 

23 

Kansas City 

30 

St. John 

12 

Seattle 

24 

Philadelphia 

37 

Omaha 



25 

Memphis 




• 

F ROM the above tabulation it may be seen that of the 
first 15 branches on accumulated delivery, exactly 
10 fall in the category of larger territories, or are af- 
filiated with the National group. Among the last 10, 
seven are Internationals, with Omaha last among the 
U. S. contingents, 4.7 behind Des Moines, 6.5 to the 
rear of Buffalo, 8.6 below Cleveland and 10.6 less than 
its Prairie district colleague, Minneapolis. The Great 
Lakes has all four of its four branches among the top 
dozen. The Coast is represented by four of its six ex- 
changes. South has three out of five up there. At- 
lantic is represented by one as is Northeast. 

• 

B UT, a somewhat different picture is furnished by 
the departmental status of branches on advance 
rentals, as reported by branch managers this week. 
Here are the 37 branches’ standings on accumulated 
seven weeks’ delivery plus 11 weeks’ advance rentals 
against 18- week quota: 


1 

Oklahoma 

13 

Milwaukee 

20 

Winnipeg 

•> 

Salt Lake 

14 

Dallas 

27 

Des Moines 

3 

Washington 

15 

Pittsburgh 

28 

Los Angeles 

4 

New Orleans 

10 

Montreal 

29 

Seattle 

5 

Toronto 

17 

Atlanta 

30 

Boston 

0 

Denver 

J 8 

Chicago 

31 

Portland 

7 

St. Louis 

19 

Indianapolis 

32 

Cincinnati 

8 

St. John 

20 

Minneapolis 

33 

Omaha 

9 

Calgary 

21 

Vancouver 

34 

Cleveland 

0 

Kansas City 

22 

Albany 

35 

Buffalo 

1 

Memphis 

23 

San Francisco 

30 

Philadelphia 

2 

New Haven 

24 

* Detroit 

37 

New York 



25 

♦Charlotte 


* Tied. 


• 

N INE of the 12 wealthiest branches in advance rentals 
expectancy are Internationals. The Nationals’ rep- 
resentatives are Wheeler’s Washington, St. Louis and 
Kansas City. Scott’s Midwest is picking up momentum 
and has all three of its offices among the departmental 
leaders on advance, with Clark’s Oklahoma City leading 
the department. As commander of the International 
forces on advance, Oklahoma City is nine-tenths of a 
point stronger than Nationals’ pacer, Wheeler’s Wash- 
ington. But the Internationals’ runner-up, Walker’s 
Salt Lake City, too, is stronger than Washington — 
some three-tenths of a point healthier in potential 
earning power. 

• 

I T IS beginning to look as if history will repeat itself 
in the British Isles. Harley’s Britons turned in a 
delivery that, considering the fact that England is at 
war, is truly remarkable. It enabled the Overseas de- 
partment to boast the highest week’s delivery, depart- 
menlally. But, what happened in England — and there 
is every reason that it will continue, unless a succession 
of air raids compel the Government to again close the 
theatres — is exactly what happened in Spain and in 
China. Notwithstanding war, both those countries dis- 
played extraordinary earning power. Here is hoping 
that England will continue, indefinitely, its remarkable 
showing of last week. 

• 

D ILLON’S Los Angeles deserve honorable mention 
for their very consistent showing in this Drive. It 
leads on total delivery and on News revenue. And on 
adsales it beat quota last week and gives signs of a 
consistent weekly improvement in that department. 
On shorts it is seventh, but that status represents a 
two-pkce drop in the sixth week. Following are the 
branches leading their respective districts on News 
and short subjects delivery: 


District News Shorts 

Atlantic Philadelphia* Washington* 

Canada Winnipeg Montreal 

('oast Los Angeles* Portland 

Lakes Detroit Detroit 

Mideast Cincinnati Buffalo 

Midwest St. Louis St. Louis 

Northeast New Haven Boston 

Prairie Minneapolis Des Moines 

South Atlanta* Atlanta 


* Branches so designated are over-quota for the six-week period. 

• 

W HEELER’S Washington is looming a potential 
champion in this Drive. That is indicated by its 
performance to date and by its increasing strength on 

| A PROUD HOLLYWOOD! I 

HOLLYWOOD— (By Wire)— Wherever stars, ! 

I producers, directors and particularly the old-tim- j 
I ers gathered here Thursday the topic of convensa- j 
• tion was the “kick” they said they got at the $11 
j world premiere of “Hollywood Cavalcade” the | 
j night before. Local trade and daily newspapers j 
1 editorialized on the picture and stressed their con- = 

! gratulations to Zanuck for the story treatment. j 



| Colonial Stveethettrls j 

i wood Cavalcade” currently hailed throughout the j 
! nation, the attention of distribution organization = 
I and of exhibitors is focused on another Zanuck ! 
| Technicolor special, “Drums Along the Mohawk,” j 
• which will get a spectacular day-and-date world j 
j premiere in cities in northern New York, accord- ! 
j ing to present plans. Below are the co-stars in j 
= this picturization of another best seller— Henry j 
| Fonda and Claudette Colbert. 



advance. But, that this combination is no accident is 
borne out by the fact that continuously Washington is 
beating its adsales quota. A1 Miller, there, is over 
quota on adsales for the seven-week period and is on 
the verge of overtaking the leader, Weinstein of New 
Haven. Here are the branches that lead their re- 
spective districts on accumulated film delivery and on 
adsales revenue for the first seven weeks: 


District Adsales Delivery 

Atlantic Wash ington Washington 

Canada Toronto Calgary 

Coast Salt Lake Los Angeles 

Lakes Detroit Indianapolis 

Mideast. . Cleveland Cincinnati 

Midwest St. Louis St. Louis 

Northeast New Haven New Haven 

Prairie .Minneapolis Minneapolis 

South Charlotte Atlanta 


P RESIDENT S. R. KENT once observed: “When you 
have enthusiasm, you can know you are on the road 
to success. Enthusiasm embodies determination and am- 
bition. And enthusiasm renders the seemingly most 
difficult task a much easier one to accomplish.” And 
one need only turn back the pages of Drive history to 
those two campaigns led by the enthusiastic Bill Gehr- 
ing. He was enthusiasm personified. He possessed the 
same enthusiasm that inspired the audience at the last 
Drive meeting at the New York exchange to want to 
“go out and lick the world.” It is that sort of en- 
thusiasm that will hurry us along to bigger things in 
this Drive. Show us an enthusiastic worker and we’ll 
show you one who is happy and doing a better job. 
There is nothing about this job that a little more en- 
thusiasm won’t bring about. 

• 

T HREE scores of men are at various “fronts” and 
risking their lives every day to get material for 
Movietone News. It’s action that exhibitors and ticket- 
buyers want where the newsreel is concerned. And 
you got plenty of it in the recent issues of Truman 
Talley’s great News. But, give a thought to those 
boys “over there” when selling. They’re risking their 
lives doing a difficult job — and doing it in the knowledge 
that you, by getting proper circulation and proper 
terms, are proving their perilous efforts worthwhile. 

• 

M ANY at the New York preview of “Hollywood Cav- 
alcade” recalled pleasant memories. Many of the 
veteran showmen on hand recalled the dramatic debut 
of Mack Sennett’s bathing beauties at what used to be 
B. S. Moss’ Broadway theatre on Broadway. It was a 
gala evening and the beauties and the picture in which 
they appeared were glamorously introduced to the “Big 
Street.” Their debut “cracked” the front page of every 
metropolitan newspaper and reserves had to be called 
to handle the huge crowds that blocked traffic day after 
day during the performance hours. 


HIGHLIGHTS 


WHEN this week’s returns in the Drive are in the 
’’ second month of this campaign will have passed 
into history. And there will be 10 weeks left to this 
effort. The next four weeks will determine the success 
of the Drive. Frankly, Mr. Wobber is surprised that 
some of the branches that trailed at the beginning of 
the campaign are still in those dingy dugouts at the 
end of the seventh week. Their sales have increased. 
The product never was better. Conditions in every sin- 
gle territory are reportedly much improved over the 
same period last year, according to all reliable and 
unbiased authorities on such matters. Still those trailers 
have not moved up, nor appreciably bettered their posi- 
tion. This is a matter of much concern not only to Mr. 
Wobber, but to Messrs. Kent, Schenck and Zanuck, 
who have several times commented on the situation. 

• 

YI/’HICH offices have fed the most amount of potential 
revenue into its advance report? That was the 
question asked of New Dynamo by an ambitious district 
manager the other day. The answer is Lorentz’s Mil- 
waukee. In the past month the Brewers boosted their 
advance by some 25 per cent, according to the official 
figures. So that you may know how your “feed” of 
the past month compared with other branches the fol- 
lowing table will be helpful. It is based on percentage 
of the 18-week Drive quota fed into the advance be- 
tween the third and eight weeks of the campaign: 


s 

!) 

10 

11 

12 


Milwaukee 
Detroit 
Indianapolis 
Montreal 
New Orleans 
Memphis 
San Francisco 
Boston 
St. John 
Denver 
Los Angeles 
Omaha 


13 

14 

15 
10 

17 

18 
10 
20 


23 

21 


Kansas City 

Philadelphia 

Portland 

New York 

Washington 

Salt Lake 

Charlotte 

Atlanta 

Vancouver 

Cleveland 

Calgary 

Dallas 

Pittsburgh 


28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 
31 
35 
30 
37 


St. Louis 
Des Moines 
Minneapolis 
Oklahoma 
Buffalo 
Seattle 
Albany 
Toronto 
New Orleans 
Cincinnati 
Chicago 
Winnipeg 


/’’'OAST has seemingly been getting the best results, 
not only so far as returns are concerned, but in 
feeding its advance. But, right at their heels are Bal- 
ance's South and the Great Lakes. True, the Midwest 
leads the districts on advance rentals, but Scott’s com- 
bination has not fed into its advance in the past four 
weeks as much as has Bailey’s Northeast, Moss’ At- 
lantic. Least contribution to future potential revenue 
has been made by Roberts’ Mideast, according to the 
records. But their contribution is only 1.5 per cent 
below that of Prairie, and eight-tenths of a per cent be- 
hind O’Loghlin’s Canada. These three districts, in 
particular, will have to substantially alter their course 
this month. The divisions’ past four-week’s advance 
contribution reflects their delivery status in that period, 
with Kupper’s West first, Gehring’s Centrals seven- 
tenths of a point behind the pacer and only one-tenth 
above Sussman’s East. 

• 

A MONG the salesmen the past month’s “feed” into 
-A the figures stacked up against the full 18-week’s 
quota is just a little behind the earning power reflected 
by the major zones, according to official statistics fur- 
nished this department. Healthiest gain against the 
18-week quota in the past month has been made by 
Paul Shalleross of New Orleans, with Zeke Miller of 
Dallas second, Edgerton of Milwaukee third, Ebersole 
of Charlotte fourth, James of Oklahoma sixth and Hol- 
ston of Charlotte sixth. Here are the 30 salesmen 
who in the past month fed the most into the 18-week 
figures against quota for that period: 


1 

Shalleross 

1 1 

Horwitz 

21 

Neger 

*> 

W. Miller 

1 2 

Laseter 

22 

D. Scott 

3 

Edgerton 

13 

Knapp 

23 

McClure 

4 

Ebersole 

14 

Tolmas 

24 

Dare 

5 

James 

15 

Iron field 

25 

Hall 

0 

Holston 

10 

Pabst 

20 

Houston 

7 

Alexander 

1 7 

Wall 

27 

Needham 

8 

Tidwell 

18 

Diamond 

28 

Kubitzki 

9 

Lorentz 

19 

Hancock 

29 

Robinette 

0 

Skillman 

20 

♦Simons 

30 

Michel 


! Of Boston. 


T HE adsales department had reason to be proud of 
its seventh week’s delivery, even if it did not quite 
hit quota level. In any case, the week’s returns did 
exceed those of the same period last year. Six ad- 
sales managers exceeded quota, but 17 of them sur- 
passed their delivery for the corresponding lap of the 
1938 Drive. In the order of percentage of increase, 
these were: 


1 

Bandy 

7 

A. McManus 

13 A. Miller 

2 

Glasier 

8 

Blasius 

1 1 Yandergrift 

3 

Youngs 

9 

Whelihan 

15 Clayson 

4 

Lester 

10 

Smith 

10 Weinstein 

5 

Lowry 

11 

Scott 

17 Gold 

0 

E. McManus 

12 

Hackney 



Of the above, Elliott and Arthur McManus exceeded 
quota as did also A1 Miller, Bandy, Lowrey, Youngs and 
Glasier. 


r 


SHE'S A COMEDIENNE 


Outstanding feature of critics’ reviews on “Here 
I Am a Stranger” is the emphasis made by many 
of them on their conclusion that Brenda Joyce 
is a comedienne. Every important critic seemingly 
was impressed by the performance given by this 
newcomer, who gives an even better account of 
herself playing opposite Richard Greene in “Here 
I Am a Stranger” than she did in “The Rains 
Came” in which she made her debut. Her next 
appearance is in the all-star cast featured in 
“Little Old New York,” now in production. 


L.„. 



10 


NEW DYNAMO 


SHOWMEN-ADSMEN 
GET BEST RESULTS 


East Is Tied By West While Dallas' 
Bandy Takes Lead In Year's Race! 


With film salesmen extending about 35 per cent greater support than 
last year, adsales managers are more confident than ever a new record 
will have been established before the end of December! 

Realizing that attainment of a new record is a natural expectation in view of 
the unparalleled array of topnotch attractions and appreciative that these vehicles 
demand greater exploitation support to fully capitalize their earning power, the adsales 
department, like the rest of the Domestic organization, will wade into the second half 
of the Drive with prospects for weekly quota delivery definitely brighter in every 
territory. 


Although adsales forces have been holding their own and a majority of the terri- 
torial departments have been much more active, there is room and ample opportunity 
for greater delivery in practically every office. But, everywhere there is evidence that 

this opportunity is not being 

ignored. This is apparent •— 

S i 1 939-40 ADSALES DELIVERY 1 


an outstanding box office 
attraction. 


“Hollywood Cavalcade” gives 
these forces every medium to 
shoot delivery to an all-time 
high. Many adsales managers 
say this will result, but these 
utterances have come from lads 
who already are distinguishing 
themselves. The need for an im- 
mediate improvement is glaring 
particularly at Omaha, New Or- 
leans, Milwaukee, Memphis, 
Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Bos- 
ton, Minneapolis, Denver and 
Oklahoma City. 

Those offices continue to be 
at the wrong end of the standing 
not only for the nine-week period 
of the K-7 season, but for the 
Drive. For instance, Fred Mil- 
ler of Omaha, last, is 50 points 
behind the new adsales pacer 
for the K-7 season, Bob Bandy 
of Dallas. And Miller is only 
five points to the rear of Johnson 
of New Orleans, who trails Heim 
of Milwaukee by three marks. 

That it is imperative to reach 
quota every week was indicated 
by the experience of Morris 
Weinstein of New Haven. He 
still leads the 
Drive, but his 
failure to 
reach quota 
cost him the 
throne in the 
standing based 
on accumulat- 
ed nine weeks’ 
adsales deliv- 
ery for the en- 
t i r e season. 

That position 
was taken over 
by Bandy of 
Dallas, who did hurdle his quota. 
In fact, Weinstein and Dallas 
swapped places, with the Nut- 
megger now in third position, 
4.5 behind A1 Miller of Washing- 
ton, who clung to the runner-up 
berth. 

Miller, however, beat quota 
and, like Bandy, is over quota 
not only for the first seven weeks 
of the Drive, but for the season’s 
nine weeks. Weinstein is over 
quota for the Drive series. 

FEUD AWAY 

The McManus brothers’ per- 
formances are attracting no lit- 
tle attention this year. 

Both beat 100 per cent last 
week. 

Elliott McManus of New York 
leaped from sixth to fourth place 
on the nine weeks’ adsales deliv- 
ery, getting within 2.4 of Wein- 
stein, after forcing Clyde Blasius 
of Salt Lake City 1.1 to his rear. 

Arthur McManus of St. Louis, 



S. Glasier 


Following is the standing of all adsales managers, branches, districts and divisions 
on accumulated nine weeks’ adsales delivery against 1939-4© adsales delivery quota 
for that period, as of September .‘JO: 


BRANCHES 


Sept 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

30th 

Branch (Ads. Manager) 

23 rd 

30th 

Branch (Ads. Manager) 

23 rd 

1 

Dallas (Bandy) 

. . . . 3 

20 


. . 19 

2 

Washington (A. Miller) . . 



Cleveland (Scott) 

. . 22 

3 

New Haven (Weinstein) . . 

. . . . 1 

22 

Buffalo (Stamp) 

. . 23 

1 



23 


. . 20 

5 

Salt Lake City (Blasius) . 

.... 5 


Pittsburgh (Vandergrift) . 

. . 24 

6 

St. Louis (A. McManus) . . 

7 

23 

Indianapolis (Orsenigo) . . 

. . 26 


Calgary (Davies) 

. . . . 4 

26 

Albany (Lester) 


O 


.... J) 

28 


. . 29 

10 


1 

29 


. . 28 


San Francisco (Lewis) . . . 

. . . . 11 

30 

Oklahoma City (Whelihan) 

. . 33 

12 


. 14 

31 



13 

Kansas City (Crawford) 


32 

Seattle (Thorpe) 

. . 32 

14 

Philadelphia (Mintz) . . . 

. . . . 8 

33 

Portland (Fox) 


ir> 


16 

3 1 



16 

Detroit (Sturm) 

. . . . 13 

35 

Milwaukee (Heimbueger) 

. . 34 

17 

Vancouver (Hislop) 

.. . . 17 

36 

New Orleans (Johnson) . . . 

. . 36 

18 

Montreal (Brault) 

. . . . 18 

37 


. . 37 

10 

Des M 'lines (Gold) 

21 






DISTRICTS 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sep<t. 

Sept. 

30tl 

District (Manager) 

23rd 

30th 

District (Manager) 

23rd 

I 


1 




•» 

Atlantic (Moss) 

2 


Great Lakes ( — ) 

8 

3 

South (Ballance) 

.... 3 

8 

Northeast (Bailey) 

7 

4 

Midwest (Scott) 

.... 5 

9 

Paririe (Levy) 

9 

3 

Coast ( — ) 

.... 4 






DIVISIONS 


Sept 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

30th 

Division (Manager) 

23 rd 

30th 

Division (Manager) 

23rd 

1 


. . . . 1 

3 


3 


West (Kupper) 

o 





1.1 behind his brother, tied th° 
Mormon, after adding to the 
woes of Davis of Calgary, who 
drooped three pegs. 

Sam Glasier of Toronto also 
hurdled quota and was able to 
hold the ninth spot, being 2.8 
behind Youngs of Los Angeles, 
another mark-buster, who 
zoomed from the tenth to eighth 
post in the season’s standing. 

Still another of the seven over- 
quota stars — Lowery of Charlotte 
— advanced. He went from 12 
to 10, vaulting, among others, 
Lewis of San Francisco. 

In contrast to Bandy, A1 Mil- 
ler. the McManus boys, Youngs, 
Glasier and Lowery, Philadel- 
phia’s Mintz dropped from eighth 
to 14th place, being almost 
nabbed by Smith of Winnipeg, 
who passed Jack Sturm of De- 
troit, the latter falling three. 

GOLD’S PAIR 

While Vancouver’s Hislop and 
Montreal’s Brault held their old 
positions, Dave Gold of Des 
Moines lumped a pair and is now 
21st. The Iowans are giving 
promise of improvement on 
every front, although Gold did 
not hit quota last week. But, 
he did come near enough to his 
target to pass Hackney of At- 
lanta and Mrs. Annabelle Kelly 


of Cincinnati, the letter forfeit- 
ing three pegs. 

Mrs. Kelly’s loss enabled not 
-' r >ly Gold, but also Nate Scott of 
Cleveland and Ed Stamp of Buf- 
falo to advance. In other words, 
the Cincinnatians were outdeliv- 
ered by their own Mideast asso- 
ciates. 

Joe Vandergrift of Pittsburgh 
held No. 24, but he is now only 
three-tenths of a point above 
Indianapolis’ Orsenigo, who 
stepped from 26 to 25. Lester 
of Albany gained one. Both 
Lester and Orsenigo were able 
to show a gain because of a hard 
drop on the part of Gwin of 
Denver, who was tied by Bill 
Clayson of Minneapolis. The 
Minneasotan and Albanian are 
1.9 ahead of Krivitsky, who lost 
a slot and is now only four points 
ahead of Jack Whelihan of Okla- 
homa City, who switched from 
33 to 30. 

Among the trailers, Thorpe of 
Seattle took No. 32 from Fox of 
Portland, while Memphis’ Gib- 
bons slapped Heim of Milwau- 
kee out of the 34th chair. 

OTHER SECTIONS 

Kupper’s West caught Suss- 
man’s East. Thus, the two are 
sharing the berth representing 
divisional command, with Gehr- 


21 SALESMEN HIT 

NEW ADSALES HIGH! 

FELD’S ZONE MARK IS 78% 

CONNELLY AND BUFFALO CREW 

REACH NEXT HIGHEST SCORES 


As this season pro- 
gresses it becomes in- 
creasingly evident that 
film salesmen are be- 
coming more adsales- 
minded. 

At the end of the 13-week 
period ended Saturday ex- 
actly 21 of them had deliv- 
ered more than 20 per cent 
of their total adsales reve- 
nue earned in their zones in 
that time. 


Samson’s Buffaloans have at- 
tained the highest individual 
salesmen’s average for adsales 
contribution in the 13-week peri- 
od. Marvin Kempner contributed 
63 per cent of his zone’s adver- 
tising business, Rowell 43.33 per 
cent and Dickman 35.7 per cent. 

Tom McCleaster of Indianapo- 
lis is still playing a major part 



Sales Manager Joe Feld of St. 
Louis is outstanding. He person- 
ally delivered some 78.18 per 
cent of his 
zone’s adsales 
revenue. And it 
must be re- 
membered that 
Arthur McMa- 
nus’ St. Louis 
adsales busi- 
ness this sea- 
son ranks with 
the highest and 
best. 

Connelly of 
Boston is right 
behind Feld, 
having been re- 
sponsible for 
Joe Feld about 17 per 
cent of his 
zone’s adsales business. 


in the Hoosiers’ adsales business. 
He sold 34 per cent of the acces- 
sories credited his zone since the 
beginning of the season. 


OUTSTANDING 


Outstanding, too, is the per- 
formance of the following sales- 
men, each one of whom was offi- 
cially charged with having ob- 
tained 20 per cent or better of 
his zone’s adsales business for 
13 weeks: 

Salesman Brunch 

Ilolston Charlotte 

Paulson Denver 


Rennie Denver 

Keilor Detroit 

Hendrix Dallas 

Ericson San Francisco 


Simons 
Diamond 
Ebersole 
Florin . 
Murphy 
Eskin . . 


.... Boston 
Washington 
. .Charlotte 
.New York 
Washington 
. .St. Louis 


Bernard San Francisco 

Mussman Minneapolis 

Kubit/.ki Kansas City 


It is significant that of the 
above film salesmen four were 
former adsales managers. These 
are: Keilor, Diamond, Eskin and 
Bernard. 


In contrast to the above, there 
were 17 salesmen who did not 
contribute a single dollar to their 
zone’s adsales business, accord- 
ing to the record. These were 
Dodson, Grohe, Loeb, Milton Si- 
mon, Bergman, Neger, Hancock, 
Michel, Lorentz, Wright, Schut- 
zer, St. Clair, Osborne, Berke, 
Davis, Skillman and Frank 
Scott. Neger, Hancock and 
Frank Scott are playing a new 
role by ranking in that division, 
for last season they were most 
active in selling accessories. 


. | Here Are National Leaders in Sale 

Of Various Advertising Accessories 

Following are the adsales managers who last week led in the sale of 
the advertising accessories listed below: 

Accessory Ads Manager Branch 

1 -sheets J. Vandergrift Pittsburgh 

3-sheets L. Mintz Philadelphia 

6-sheets .1. Hackney Atlanta 

21 -sheets J. L. Sturm, Jr Detroit 

14x22 Window Cards J. L. Sturm, Jr Detroit 

14x36 Inserts W. L. Clayson Minneapolis 

11x14 Photos W. L. Clayson Minneapolis 

22x28 Photos E. McManus New York 

14x17 Photos S. Krivitsky Boston 

8x14 Midget Window Cards C. A. Blasius Salt Lake City 

8x10 Stills E. McManus New York 

DeLuxc 11x14 Photos A. Miller Washington 

Slides A. Smith Winnipeg 

Heralds A. Miller Washington 

1 -sheets Enlargements A. McManus St. Louis 

Fan Photos W. L. Clayson Minneapolis 

Double Window Cards N. Scott Cleveland 

Paint Displays E. McManus New York 

10x60 Colored Enlargements E. McManus New Y’ork 

3-foot Standees E. Orsenigo Indianapolis 

Novelties F. Lowrey Charlotte 

Bumper Strips A. McManus St. Louis 

Bannerettes R. M. Bandy Dallas 

18-inch Standees A. McManus St. Louis 

O-foot Foldisplays A. McManus St. Louis 

O-foot Banners L. Mintz Philadelphia 

Hangers E. Gibbons Memphis 

Rulers L. Lowrey Charlotte 


j 


i 


ing’s Central 6.6 points behind 
that pair. 

Among the districts, O’Logh- 
lin’s Canada remained leader for 
the first nine weeks of this sea- 
son. The Dominions are only 
six-tenths of a point richer than 
Moss’ Atlantics. Another week 
like A1 Miller of Washington had 
last week and the Atlantics are 
certain to take over command in 
this race. The Atlantics are first 
on adsales results in the Drive. 

Ballance’s South is third, 2.8 
behind Atlantic, but with Scott’s 
Midwest worrying it. The lat- 


ter, thanks particularly to Art 
McManus, has been gaining 
ground steadily. This week Mid- 
west placed itself within two- 
tenths of a point of Dixie, after 
exchanging places with Coast. 

No Great Lakes department 
reached quota, but each did bet- 
ter than Bailey’s Northeast. Re- 
sult: Lakes is now seventh, hav- 
ing passed the Yankees. Great 
Lakes is 1.2 behind Roberts’ 
Mideast, which needs six points 
to catch the Coast. Levy’s Prai- 
rie is still last, 2.2 behind North- 
east. 



NEW DYNAMO 


11 


BUFFALO 

SALESMEN MOST 

ADS-MINDED 


Samson’s Buffalo 
leads the field in film 
salesmen’s results on 
adsales for the past 13 
weeks, or since July 1. 
Nationally, the film sales- 
men’s contribution to the 
13-week departmental total 
adsales delivery amounted 
to just about 10 per cent. 

Buffalo’s salesmen Kempner, 
Rowell and Dickman have di- 
rectly sold more than 41 per cent 
of the adsales business credited 
Buffalo in that period, the offi- 
cial records showed this week. 

That was 12 per cent greater 
than the score piled up by Mor- 
rison’s Denver salesmen. Messrs, 
Paulson and Rennie are respon- 
sible for 29 per cent of Denver’s 
13-week adsales delivery, just 
one-half point above the score 
that Reingold’s St. Louisans can 
boast. 

Least contribution of salesmen 
to adsales is charged against 
Sam Gross’ Philadelphians, 
whose combined score is only 
one-tenth of a point behind that 
of Walker’s Salt Lake Citians 
and one-half point behind the 
mark credited Wilson’s Atlan- 
tans. 

Following is the rating of the 
branches (with film salesmen) 
on salesmen’s percentage of then- 
respective zones’ total 13-week 
adsales delivery, as of Saturday, 
and the branches’ status on nine 
weeks’ K-7 adsales delivery and 
for the Drive: 



9-Wk. 

7-Wk. 

PI. 

Branch (Manager) K-7 

Drive 

1 

Buffalo (Samson) ... 22 

19 

!» 

Denver (Morrison) . . 27 

18 

3 

St. Louis (Reingold) . 6 

9 

1 

Charlotte (Longdon) . 10 

3 

5 

Boston (Callahan) . . 29 

25 

6 

Frisco (Ballentine) . . 11 

10 

7 

Washington (Wheeler) 2 

•> 

K 

Kansas City (Fuller) . 13 

13 

!> 

Minneapolis (Podoloff) 28 

26 

IO 

Cleveland (Schmertz) . 21 

14 

1 I 

Des Moines (Mayer) . 19 

30 

li 

Dallas (Beiersdorf) . . 1 

4 

13 

Memphis (Young) . . 34 

i31 

1 I 

N. Orleans (Landaiche) 36 

36 

15 

Albany (Grassgrecn) . . 26 

24 

16 

Detroit (Sturm) .... 16 

9 

1 7 

Seattle (Edmond) . . 32 

28 

18 

Cincinnati (Grady) . . 23 

17 

19 

Pittsburgh (Cohn) . . 21 

16 

20 

Indianapolis (Landis). 25 

29 

21 

Chicago (Eckhardt) . 31 

35 

22 

Portland (Powers) . . 33 

33 

23 

Omaha (Scott) 37 

37 

24 

Toronto (Bailey) ... 9 

5 

25 

Los Angeles (Dillon). 8 

15 

26 

Milwaukee (Lorentz). 35 

21 

27 

Oklahoma (Clark) . . 30 

32 

28 

Montreal (English) . 18 

34 

29 

New York (Buxbaum) 4 

6 

30 

Atlanta (Wilson) . . . 20 


31 

Salt Lake (Walker) . . 5 

7 

32 

Philadelphia (Gross) . 11 

11 

33 

Winnipeg (Huber) . . 15 

27 

34 

New Haven (Simon) . 3 

1 



I WASHINGTON 
PLANS COUP 
IN THE DRIVE j 


S WASHINGTON — Sam j 

Wheeler’s Washington j 
| claims the Nationals’ j 
! championship in the Kent j 

[ Drive! j 

This claim will be ! 
backed with an October- j 
j November delivery that is j 
i intended to serve as a j 
I “blow to the other as- | 
| pi rants.” j 

Bookings are mounting j 
I in a manner that leaves I 
| no doubt that the office is j 
] getting unprecedented ? 
j support from exhibitors. 

( Washington has set its | 

| coming releases in such a 5 
I manner that revenue from j 
j the big - money accounts j 
J will be steady. The sub- s 
? sequent runs were never | 
j better booked. 

That occupancy of first j 
! place on advance among ! 
j the branches in the Na- j 
| tional group is no idle af- 
I fair, but representative of \ 
j where this office will fin- j 

j ish ~ | 


ENGLAND COMING BACK? 
REPEATS WAR HISTORY! 


HIGH 

MARKS FOR 

RE-ISSUES 

Western Division’s 
Results Prove 
Outstanding- 

Branches in the 
Western division are 
getting the greater re- 
sults on re-issuance of 
hits of past seasons. 

But, the Domestics have 
set a new record for amount 
of extra revenue and volume 
of playtime secured on re- 
issues. 

Outstanding are the returns 
obtained by branches in the 
Midwest and in the South. 

These, so far, have been ob- 
tained chiefly from such re-is- 
sues as “Jesse James,” “Alex- 
ander’s Ragtime Band,” “Banjo 
on My Knee” 
and others. 

Howev e r , 
every ex- 
change has 
been m ore 
active than 
in any past 
season with 
regard to re- 
vival of past 
hits. Exhibi- 
tors have 
been surpris- 
ingly recep- 
tive to such 
revival, judging from the quan- 
tity and calibre of playtime se- 
cured. 

In many cases, K-7 prospects 


I 



Paul Wilson 


FOREIGN 

DRIVE 


Sept. 30: 

9/30 Country (Manager) 




9/23 


Japan ( Doyle) 1 

China (Lopato) 6 

Hungary (Matzner) 3 

Colombia (Day) 5 

Trinidad (O’Gara) 4 

Norway (Mathieson) 7 

Fed. Mai. States (Goldsmith) . . 6 

Puerto Rico (Zeno) 10 

India (Newber.v) 6 

Venezuela (Amodio) 0 

D. E. Indies (Mayer) 12 

Mexico (Mohme) 16 

Argentine (Horen) 13 

Australia (Hake) 13 

Brazil (Bavetta) H 

Jugoslavia (Selan) 18 

Denmark (Frandsen) 22 

New Zealand (Rutledge) 19 

Finland (Biornstad) 1? 

Latvia (Lurje) H 

South Africa (Bolle) 21 

Panama (Sullivan) 20 

Sweden (Isdalil) 21 

Holland (Groen) 23 

Egypt (Giordano) 25 

Chile (Ruscica) 27 

Philippines (Lederman) 26 

Peru (Chiesa) ~8 

England (Harley) 32 

Portugal (Pariente) 29 

France (Morgan) 33 

Cuba (White) 31 

Spain (Lopez) . . 3 * 

Czechoslovakia (Urban) 10 

No reports available from Germany, 
oland, and Rumania. 


have marked time pending ne- 
gotiation of deals for this sea- 
son by playing re-issues. The 
amount of revenue thus ob- 
tained is of a surprising size. 

Wilson’s Atlanta is rapidly 
gaining on Oklahoma City, 
Kansas City and St. Louis in 
size of revenue earned from re- 
issues, with bookings for Oc- 
tober and November very prom- 
ising. 


SALESMEN'S ADS DELIVERY 


t-o-m 


Following is the standing of all sales- 
men based on percentage of film sales- 
men’s individual contributions to the 
total zone adsales delivery for the 13- 
week period as of September 30: 

PI. Salesman Branch 

1 J. Feld St. Louis 

2 J. Connelly Boston 

3 M. Kempner Buffalo 

4 W. Rowell Buffalo 

5 G. Dickman Buffalo 

6 T. McCleastcr Indianapolis 

7 J. Holston Charlotte 

8 L. Paulson Denver 

9 H. Rennie Denver 

10 H. Keilor Detroit 

11 T. Hendrix Dallas 

12 J. Erickson San Francisco 

13 M. Simons Boston 

1 1 J. Diamond Washington 

15 J. Ebersole Charlotte 

1<» S. Florin New York 

17 J. Murphy Washington 

18 R. Eskin St. Louis 

19 F. Bernard San Francisco 

20 W. Mussman Minneapolis 

21 W. Kubitzki Kansas City 

22 S. Riegelman Des Moines 

23 S. Lichter Cleveland 

24 H. Lyons Minneapolis 

F. Sliter Chicago 


52 S. Gottlieb Des Moines 


PI. 

53 


58 

59 

60 
01 
62 
63 
61 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 


78 

79 

80 
81 
82 


Salesman Branch 

W. Miller Dallas 

N. Horwitz Milwaukee 

T. Baskin Memphis 

H. Iron field Omaha 

G. Halloran Omaha 

G. Spear Seattle 

II. Goodamote Chicago 

E. Westcott Detroit 

N. Houston Dallas 

W. Humphries Philadelphia 

G. McClure Atlanta 

C. Knickerbocker . . . .Kansas City 

II. Shallcross New Orleans 

G. Moore Pittsburgh 

N. Remer Albany 

G. James Oklahoma City 

C. Robinette Portland 

II. Laseter Atlanta 

W. Robison Los Angeles 

N. Scott Dallas 

R. Carrow Detroit 

W. Wall Los Angeles 

N. Thorpe Pittsburgh 

E. Burkart Cincinnati 

II. Alexander Boston 

( ) Montreal 

M. Kurtz New York 

J. McElhinney . . . .Salt Lake City 

II. Mitchell Atlanta 

Y. Dugan Salt Lake City 


26 

L. Williams . . . 

St. Louis 

83 

L. Lester 


27 

J. Cohan 

. . . .Minneapolis 

81 

W. Krupp .... 

Winnipeg 

•;x 

A. Interrante . . 

Pittsburgh 

85 

J. Tidwell .... 

. . . Salt Lake City 

29 

B. Dare 


86 

S. Fairchild . . . 

Atlanta 

30 

G. I’abst 


87 

B. Tolmas .... 

Philadelphia 

31 

A. Laurice 


88 

N. Blumstein . 

New York 

32 

H. (iohl 


89 

G. Black 








34 

G. Ware 

St. Louis 

91 

*E. Grohe 


35 

T. Mock 

Charlotte 

92 

*11. Loch 

Chicago 




93 



37 

N. Hall 


94 

*T. Bergman . . 

Cleveland 

38 

T. Scheinberg . . 


95 

*N. Neger 

Indianapolis 







10 

J. O’Neill 

Des Moines 

97 

*G. Edgerton . . 

Milwaukee 

ll 

G. Norris 


98 

*M. Michel . . . 


42 

A. Knapp 


99 

*E. Lorentz . . 

Minneapolis 

43 

J. Woodward . . 

.... Kansas City 

100 

*E. Wright .... 


44 

L. Bugic 


101 

*W. Schutzer . . 

. . New York City 

15 

S. Kinser 

.... Kansas City 

102 

*J. St. Clair. . . . 

. .New York City 

46 

G. Naegel 

Cincinnati 

103 

*N. Osborne . . . 

. .Oklahoma City 

47 

II. Frederick . . . 

Seattle 

101 

*R. Berke 


IS 

F. Klein 

Washington 

105 

*A. Davis 

Philadelphia 

10 

IV. Reid 


106 

*J. Skill man . . . 

Philadelphia 

50 

J. Needham . . . . 


107 

*N. Scott 


51 







(*) Blank. 


INDUSTRY CHEERED 

BY IMPROVEMENT THERE 

BRITONS NEARING QUOTA! 


BUT EMBARGO ON TRANSFER OF 
MONEY FROM THERE IS STILL ON 


Harley’s Britons are beginning- to find the reaction 
of motion picture theatregoers and the general public 
to modern warfare exactly the same as did Chinese 
and the Spaniards! 

That was stressed by Overseas Drive returns from the 
British Isles when the fourth week’s returns were officially 
checked. In fact, British returns have been zooming for 
the past three weeks. 

It was the report of the British organization that enabled the 
Overseas department to enjoy its healthiest week so far in the Drive. 

While war restrictions forbid the transfer of money from England 
to other countries, the improvement in the British situation is the 
brightest news to come from abroad in months. Cabled reports 

indicate the industry’s situation i 

should continue to improve, for 
all companies, according to the 
Hays organization and the trade 
press, have been showing an in- 
creasing weekly revenue from 
the British Isles since the Gov- 
ernment there heeded public de- 
mand and al- 
lowed thef 
theatres to 1 
re - open and ! 
to operate i 
under, of 
course, cer- 
tain war reg- 
ulations. 

In fact, the ’ 

O v e r seas 
Drive returns 
for the first 
month find 
two nations 
at war with 
each other 
for practical- 
ly the past 
two years, 
actually lead- 
ing the parade. 


-s 




R. S. Dawes 


Carlos Zeno 


F. L. Harley 

And both a 


over quota and have been estab- 
lishing new records. Doyle’s 
Japs, still pacing, came through 
with their fourth successive 
over-quota week. Their accumu- 
lated four weeks’ delivery is bet- 
ter than double quota. 

War-torn China, which under- 
went a vicious resumption of at- 
tack from the Japs last week, 
found the lap its best so far in 
the Drive and beat quota to such 
an extent that it leaped into the 
runner-up position in the depart- 
mental four - weeks’ standing, 
hurdling Matzner’s Hungarians. 

OTHER FACTS 

England jumped its fourth 
week’s revenue some 33 per cent 
over its total for the third lap, 
which showed an increase over 
the second. 

Three European countries — 
Frandsen’s Danes, Mathiesen’s 
Norwegians and Matzner’s Hun- 
garians — beat quota. Ten Over- 
seas branches exceeded their 
quota, according to the official 
cabled returns. The other seven 
were : 

China 
Mexico 
Colombia 
Trinidad 

Reports from Germany, the 
erstwhile Poland, and Roumania 
continue to be conspicuous by 
their absence, as there is no 
means of communications with 
those countries. 

Goodman’s Far East is still in 
command of the divisional race, 
being far ahead of Hake’s Aus- 
tralasians. South America is 
still third, seven-tenths of a 


F. M. States 
Puerto Rico 
Japan 


point behind the Antipodes and 
2.8 above Central America. But, 
the British division edged its way 
out of the cellar, ahead of Mig- 
gins’ Europe, topping the conti- 
nent by 3.3. 

39-WEEK RACE 

Japan also leads the Over- 
seas department in the 39-week 
race of the 1938 year, according 
to official returns. Day’s Colom- 
bia is still second, just one point 
above Mathiesen’s Norwegians. 

Ex-Albanian Goldsmith’s Fed- 
erated Malay States office is 
fourth on the 39-week effort, 6.7 
behind Norway and 3 3 richer 
than Selan’s Jugo-Slovakians. 

Highest percentage of 39- 
week’s business for 1938 over the 
seme period last year has been 
effected by Japan, with Fed- 
erated Malay States second, Gus 
Mohme’s Mexico third, Isdahl’s 
Sweden fourth and Day’s Colom- 
bia fifth. 

Divisionally, for 39 weeks, 
Far East continues first, 3.5 
ahead of Miggins’ Europe, which 
tops Harley’s British Isles by 
5.3. In fourth divisional place 
is Central America, 2.7 to the 
rear of the Britons and one- 
tenth stronger than South Amer- 
ica. Hake’s Australia is sixth, 
six-tenths behind South Ameri- 
ica. 

Following is the standing of 
every foreign country on accu- 
mulated 39 weeks’ total delivery 
against 39 weeks’ quota for that 
period : 


1 Japan 

2 Colombia 

3 Norway 

I F. M. States 

5 Jugo-SIavia 

6 Sweden 

7 Trinidad 

8 Spain 

9 So. Africa 

10 France 

11 China 

12 Argentina 

13 Denmark 

14 Egypt 

15 Holland 

16 Czeclioslov. 

17 Puerto Rieo 

18 Philippines 


1 9 England 

20 Hungary 

21 Peru 

22 Panama 

23 Mexico 
21 Germany 

25 Australia 

26 Latvia 

27 New Zealand 

28 D. E. Indies 

29 Poland 

30 Brazil 

31 Cuba 

32 Portugal 

33 Finland 
31 India 

35 Chile 

36 Venezuela 




FYHIRITfM HRARRIMI 

ii “firqt wori n war”i 

; LAnlDI 1 Uno UnMuDllil 

j rlnol WUnLU WAR ! 




Surely, a Lovable Quartet 

Shirley Temple, Cecilia Loftus, Johnny Russell and A1 Shean 
are pictured above. Of course, it is from the Zanuck Technicolor 
picturization of “The Blue Bird.” Dorris Bowdon, Gale Sondergaard, 
Eddie Collins, Laura Hope Crews, and Spring Byington are others 
in this production which will be ready for holiday release. 



Henry King, megaphoner of “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” “Jesse 
James,” “Stanley and Livingstone” and other hits, has started his 
second K-7 special, “Little Old New York.” Above, Richard Greene 
and Alice Faye, who are co-starred in this super production, with 
Fred MaeMurray. Andy Devine and others also appear in the cast. 



Fourth Titled 


The Cisco Kid Loves Again! 


Jane Withers (above) and 
Gene Autry will be co-starred 
in “Shooting High,” definite title 
for “Jubilo.” 


And this romantic hombre doesn’t hesitate to use the gun — as 
this scene would prove. This week the studio announced that the 
definite title for the first in this new series would be “The Cisco 
Kid and the Lady.” It had been in production as “The Adventurer.” 



A 24-Slieet Every Livewire Showman Will Want! 


“The Man Who Wouldn’t Talk” 

Among those pictured in this closeup of the courtroom scene from 
the drama of that title are Lloyd Nolan (who has the title role), 
and, Jean Rogers, who has the feminine lead. Others in the cast are 
Onslow Stevens, Irving Bacon and Richard Clark. 


This poster sells everything — and quickly! Word from the studio was that with “Hollywood 
Cavalcade” auspiciously launched, Zanuck is planning to preview his second Technicolor special, 
“Drums Along the Mohawk” within the next few days. Those who have been privileged to see the 
“rushes” insist that “Drums Along the Mohawk” will be the current season’s No. 1 grosser. An- 
other important piece of news that reached the East at press-time reported start of “shooting” on the 
picturization of John Steinbeck’s sensational best selling novel of today, “The Grapes of Wrath” with 
Henry Fonda starred. John Ford, who made “Drums Along the Mohawk,” is directing. 


DRUMS ALONG MOHAWK" READY FOR PREVIEW! 




Printed in U.S.A. 






i L 


20.000 MEN'" ANOTHER COCK-EYED WORLD . SAYS StUDIO 





Vol. II 


New York, N. Y., October 7, 1939 


No. 23 


Great Composer Goes Romantic 

By the time you read this issue production on the fourth of the 
Zanuck Technicolor super specials — “Swanee River” — will probably 
have been completed. Above, Andrea Leeds and Don Ameche. 


“Little Old 


New York” 


There’s Heaven on Earth 


Fred MacMurray, Alice Faye 
and Richard Greene in an early 
sequence from one of Zanuck’s 
major undertakings for this sea- 
son. Several days after “shoot- 
ing” started on “Little Old New 
York” another outstanding ve- 
hicle was started — the picturiza- 
tion of John Steinbeck’s current 
best-selling novel, “The Grapes 
of Wrath.” Henry King, who 
this season already has one box 
office hit, “Stanley and Living- 
stone,” to his directorial credit, 
is making “Little Old New 
York.” In the cast of the latter 
production also will be featured 
Brenda Joyce who this week 
drew fine notices for her per- 
formance in “Here I Am a 
Stranger,” which followed up her 
debut in “The Rains Came.” 
Alice Faye was this week credit- 
ed by critics and exhibitors with 
giving the finest performance of 
her career in “Hollywood Caval- 
cade,” sharing honors with Don 
Ameche. Andy Devine has the 
featured comedy role. 


Just a “Big” Sister 

Shirley Temple and Johnny Russell in a 
closeup from the Technicolored picturization of 
Maeterlinck’s “The Blue Bird,” in production. 


Sybil Jason in a characteristic scene with Shirley 
Temple from this company’s holiday present to the 
exhibitors of America, “The Blue Bird,” which is now 
in its second month of “shooting.” 

Others appearing in support of Shirley in this 
production that Walter Lang is directing are: Gale 
Sondergaard, Eddie Collins, Helen Ericson, Laura 
Hope Crews, Cecilia Loftus, A1 Shean, Spring By- 
ington, Nigel Bruce, Jessie I 
Ralph and Leona Roberts. 


The Lull Before the Storm 

You can just bet your last dollar Linda Darnell and Binnie Barnes 
are up to no good for Tyrone Power and Warren William in this 
tete-a-tete from “First Kiss,” which is the new title for sophis- 
ticated farce comedy formerly known as “Daytime Wife.” 


And It’s All Over This Charmer 

Ray Milland, Sonja Henie and Robert Cummings appear in this 
closeup from “Evei’ything Happens At Night” which Irving Cum- 
mings, who megaphoned “Hollywood Cavalcade,” is directing. Later 
this Winter, in December, Sonja will start work on her second K-7 
special, S. S. Van Dine’s “Shadows in the Snow.” 


7 ZANUCK SPECIALS 
BEFORE CAMERAS! 

Story on page 2A 


! LL 


FIRST KISS” IS DEFINITE TITLE FOR DAYTIME WIFE” 







2A 


STUDIO SPECIAL 


SEVEN ZANUCK 
SPECIALS NOW 
IN PRODUCTION 


M ovietone city — Before 

the cameras at press-time 
Zanuck had a total of seven im- 
portant productions. This is the 
largest number of specials he 
has had in “shooting” at one 
time since he took charge of this 
corporation’s production activi- 
ties. The total jumped to seven 
when “The Grapes of Wrath” 
and “He Married His Wife,” di- 
rected by John Ford and Roy 
Del Ruth, respectively, were 
started. 

• 


S TART of production on “The 
Grapes of Wrath” was Zan- 
uck’s answer to those who in- 
sisted that he would never at- 
tempt the picturization of that 
sensational best seller of today. 
His story treatment is a closely 
guarded secret. In fact, Nun- 
nally Johnson’s screenplay of 
John Steinbeck’s novel will not 
be revealed until its world prem- 
iere which will be an event of 
national importance. 


• 

N O venture Zanuck has ever 
undertaken has brought so 
much mail as followed his an- 
nouncement that he would make 
“The Grapes of Wrath.” Daily 
for the past two months this 
mail has mounted. Rumors ga- 
lore have been published. Mil- 
lions are wondering how the 
story can be transferred to the 
screen. Their curiosity was fur- 
ther heightened when word was 
given out that Author Stein- 
beck had personally approved 
and was most enthusiastic over 
Johnson’s adaptation. 


A MORE faithful picturization 
of a best seller this indus- 
try will never have turned out. 
That much can be reported here. 
When this company negotiated 
for the screen rights to “The 
Grapes of Wrath,” the deal car- 
ried the specific understanding 
that it could not be filmed until 
Steinbeck had personally ap- 
proved the script. Steinbeck re- 
cently was quoted as saying that 
he “was thoroughly pleased with 
the adaptation.” 

• 

S HOOTING” was not started 
until Zanuck and Director 
John Ford had cast every char- 
acter in the story. Henry Fonda, 
whose performance in “Drums 
Along the Mohawk,” in which 
he co-stars with Claudette Col- 
bert, is considered even greater 
than his characterization in 
“Young Mr. Lincoln,” will be 
starred as Tom Joad. John Car- 
radine will be Casy, the preach- 
er; Jane Darwell, Ma Joad; Dor- 
ris Bowdon, Rosasharn; Eddie 
Quillan, Rosasharn’s husband; 
Frank Darien, Uncle John; Rus- 
sell Simpson, Pa Joad; John 
Qualen, Mulie; Frank Sully, 
Grandpa Joad; Zeftie Tillbury, 
Grandma Joad and O. Z. White- 
head, Al. 

• 

0 . Z. WHITEHEAD, who will 
play Al in “The Grapes of 
Wrath,” arrived here this week. 
He has been imported from 
Broadway, where he is well 
known having appeared in sev- 
eral hits there in the past two 
seasons. His selection completed 
a three-month’s search for some- 
one to fill this important role. 
Some two scores of screen tests 
of actors here had been made be- 
fore he was located. 

• 

I N “He Married His Wife” are 
co-starred Joel McCrea and 
Nancy Kelly. Other Zanuck spe- 
cials that were “shooting” at 
press-time were “Swanee River,” 
“Everything Happens at Night,” 
“The Blue Bird,” “First Kiss” 
and “Little Old New York.” 
“Drums Along the Mohawk . will 
be shipped to New York within 
a few days. 


j “Swanee River" and “First Kiss” 


At the left are Felix Bressart, Andrea Leeds and Al Jolson in a 
scene from “Swanee River,” one of the four Technicolor super 
specials scheduled for release this season. At the right are Warren Williams and Tyrone Power in “First Kiss,” the latter being 
the definite title selected for the sophisticated domestic farce formerly known as “Daytime Wife.” Powers’ next will be “Mark of 
Zorro." which is scheduled to start next month. 





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Plenty Interest 


“The Grapes of Wrath” 
is the big feature of the 
November issue of Photo- 
play, now on the news- 
stands. 

This article is unques- 
tionably one of the most 
interesting published in 
the “fan” magazines and 
should be read by every 
member of the distribution 
organization as well as by 
exhibitors. 

Zanuck has received 
more than 8,000 letters 
from readers of John 
Steinbeck’s best seller 
since he announced he 
would transfer the story 
to the screen. 


I 

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“FIRST KISS” IS 
NEW TITLE FOR 
“DAYTIME WIFE” 


M ovietone city — “First 

Kiss,” a beautiful and show- 
men’s title that teases the im- 
agination, has been announced as 
the permanent title for the Zan- 
uck production formerly known 
as “Daytime Wife.” “First Kiss” 
is scheduled to be completed by 
the end of next week and is a 
sophisticated domestic farce 
comedy that promises to be one 
of the hilarious hits of the sea- 
son. Boasting one of the finest 
casts assembled for a single pic- 
ture by Zanuck. “First Kiss” is 
being directed by Gregory Ratoff 
and is important on many counts. 
• 

T HE production chief, after 
looking at the daily “rushes,” 
is certain that “First Kiss,” from 
every angle, will prove a strong- 
er box office vehicle than either 
“Wife, Husband and Friend” and 
others of that type that he has 
produced for this company in the 
past three seasons. For one 
thing, the studio is especially 
enthusiastic not over the fact 
that Ratoff is turning out what 
will indisputably be his best en- 
tertainment, but because the Ty- 
rone Power-Linda Darnell team 
rings the bell — and in no uncer- 
tain manner. Linda Darnell is 
living up to the studio’s high- 
est expectations, the “rushes” 
show. 

• 

J AMMED with breezy dialogue, 
hilarious situations and beau- 
tiful, intimate love scenes, “First 
Kiss” will present Tyrone Power 
in a role that is new for him. 
and in which he is certain to 
give extreme pleasure to his fol- 
lowers. 


SAY “20,000 MEN” RANKS 
WITH “COCK EYED WORLD” 


By Airmail to New Dynamo 

M ovietone city— T he sec- 
ond Cosmopolitan production 


for 1939-40 release — “20,000 
Men a Year” — is in the bag! 
That is the opinion of studio ex- 
ecutives and others who attended 
a preview of this Wurtzel special 
this week. Hot from today’s 
newspaper headlines, “20,000 
Men a Year” is a showmanship 
coup, because it combines the ro- 
mance of America’s peace-time 
aviation with a highly significant 
and unprecedented, recent devel- 
opment — the creation of thou- 
sands of flyers annually in the in- 
terest of augmenting national 
defense. 

A MERICA will thrill to young 
America as tomorrow’s men 
I with wings zoom into the clouds 
and find 
roaring, ro- | 
mantic ad- 
venture in 
the conquest 
of the fron- 
tiers of the 
sky. It is 
the opinion 
of the studio 
that “20,000 
MenaYear,” 
telling as it 
does the 
story of the 
lives of 
America’s 
aviators of 
tomorrow, is ideally geared for 
box office success. Studio at- 
taches who saw the picture were 
this week extending congratula- 
tions to Wurtzel and Director 
Alfred Greene. There is also 
much praise heard around the lot 
for the cast which features Ran- 
dolph Scott, Preston Foster, 
Margaret Lindsay, Mary Healy, 
Robert Shaw, George Ernest, 
Jane Darwell and Maxie Rosen- 
bloom. 

T HE general belief here is that 
what “The Cock Eyed World” 
was in its day, “20,000 Men a 
Year” will prove this season. 


where exhibitors get enthusias- 
tically behind this production 
with the two-fisted exploitation 
support its merits. Veteran fliers 
in the audience at today’s pre- 
view of “20,000 Men a Year” 
marvelled at the really terrifying 
action scenes in the picture. 
Notable were the scenes filmed in 
the Grand Canyon of the Colo- 
rado and in the canyons of Zion 
Park with zooming, soaring 
planes scraping the canyon walls, 
fighting their way ont of im- 
passes and dead-end canyon 
traps. Parachute jumps into the 
canyon where the walls are more 
than a mile high also provided 
plenty more thrills. 

• 

M argaret lindsay, who 

won a loyal following for her 
work in “Jezebel.” “Hell’s Kitch- 
en” and "The Under-Pup,” plays 
the role of a strong-willed, intel- 
ligent girl who opposes her 
younger brother’s flying ambi- 
tions. This brings her into op- 
position to Randolph Scott, her 
brother’s instructor, — and there 
the romance begins. Preston 
Foster, who has won added popu- 
larity in recent pictures, turns 
in a smashingly fine perform- 
ance. As the hard-boiled aero- 
nautical official he starts out as 
Scott’s aeronautical pal but 
clashes later, on occasion after 
occasion, as fate pushes them 
into opposition to each other. 

• 

F AVORITE of millions, rugged 
Randolph Scott plays the role 
of the veteran flyer who trains 
college youths as aviators for 
Uncle Sam under the new “20,000 
Men a Year” national defense 
program. Scott, who scored per- 
sonal triumphs in “Jesse James” 
and “Frontier Marshal,” turns in 
a performance which will further 
boost his percentage rating as a 
star in thousands of theatres. 
Scott is handsome, virile, kindly 
and a square-shooter. He regis- 
ters all the genial qualities of a 
Gary Cooper, the steely strength 
of a William S. Hart in his hey- 
day. 



"SHOOTING HIGH" IS TITLE FOR THE 
S JANE WITHERS-GENE AUTRY SPECIAL 

I — i 

MOVIETONE CITY— “Shooting High” is the definite title 
for “Jubilo” which will be the Jane Withers-Gene Autry co- I 
j 1 starring vehicle. Production will start late this month. Autry j 
j is busy appearing in a production being made by a studio that = 
j has him under contract. But, he will have completed that I 
! assignment well before Jane returns from a personal appear- j 
( ance in Boston, starting next Saturday. 


Setting 1940-41 | 

j Zanuck’s plans for 1940- j 
| 41 are taking form. 

To date he has acquired i 
j rights to some 28 novels [ 

I and plays that he plans I 
! including among this com- j 
| pany’s pictures for next \ 

| I season. 

This week he announced j 
j purchase of the screen j 
| rights to “Marching As to ! 
War,” which tells a com- j 
| | prehensive story of the i 
jj Salvation Army— and its ! 

! founders, General and j 
I Mrs. William Booth. This [ 
j organization was founded l 
■ many years ago and start- j 
| I ed functioning in America | 
j in 1880. Lawrence Pohle ! 

: and Thomas Aherne are j 
I writing the original story, j 

i _J 

“THE CISCO KID 
AND THE LADY” 
IS COMPLETED 


M ovietone city — “The 

Cisco Kid and the Lady” is 
I the title under which “The Ad- 
venturer” will be released, Ex- 
ecutive Producer Sol M. Wurtzel 
announced Friday. This is the 
first release in the new r Cisco 
Kid series in which Cesar Ro- 
mero will be starred as the ro- 
mantic outlaw'. Herbert I. Leeds 
completed production on “The 
Cisco Kid and the Lady” this 
week. Others appearing in this 
vehicle include Marjorie Weaver, 
Virginia Field, Chris-Pin Martin, 
Robert Barat, Harry Green, 
Ward Bond and Gloria White. 

• 

S TARTING dates were an- 
nounced this week for the 
third release in the “Charlie 
Chan” and “Jones Family” 
groups. The third of the former, 
starring Sidney Toler, will be 
“Charlie Chan’s Oriental Cruise” 
and will be started early in De- 
cember. However, on Nov. 1 
Malcolm St. Clair will direct 
“Young As You Feel,” which is 
the title for the third of the 
Jones Family comedies. 

• 

P AUL MANTZ, ace screen 
stunt flyer in “20,000 Men A 
| Year,” has done such splendid 
work that Wurtzel has ordered 
screen credit for him. Under 
Director Alfred Green, Mantz 
served as technical director and 
also flew the camera ship 
throughout in addition to per- 
forming a number of spectacular 
thrill flights. This is the first 
time this studio has given such 
credit. 




STUDIO SPECIAL 


3A 


THE LATEST SURVEY OF 1939-40 LINEUP 


As of Oct. 6 


SWA N E E RIVER — A Technicolor super special drama- ] 

tizing the romance of the greatest writer of American 
popular melodies, Stephen Foster, the story of a man 
whose songs had on the re-making of a nation. A 
man torn between two loves. Consolidated in this 
drama is the colorful career of the first minstrel, 

E. P. Christie, the Barnum of his day, the man who 
started Foster on his road to fame. In the telling of 
the story some of the best known Foster melodies are 
sung by Don Ameche, the famous Hall Johnson choir 
and A1 Jolson the numbers including “Oh Suzannah,” 
“My Old Kentucky Home,” “Swanee River,” “Old 
Black Joe” and others. Don Ameche portrays Foster. 

A1 Jolson is the minstrel man. Andrea Leeds has the 
romantic lead. Others in the cast include Chick Chan- 
dler, George Reed, Richard Clarke, Leona Roberts, 
Milburn Stone, Charles Trowbridge and George Mee- 
ker. Sidney Lanfield is directing. A Zanuck super 
special. In production. 

DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK — A Technicolor super 
special. Based on the best selling novel by Walter D. 
Edmonds, with screenplay by Lamar Trotti and Sonya 
Levien. A stirring, action spectacle of the white 
colonists’ fight for liberty, for the right to live in 
a new land they seek to develop into a new nation, 
incorporating the love of two young people who found 
happiness under circumstances when their lives were 
constantly in danger. One of the greatest American 
stories ever written, of liberty-loving whites fighting 
against their own and being subjected to torture from 
Indians, laid in the Revolutionary War period. This 
production was almost three years in preparation and 
production. Co-starring Claudette Colbert and Henry 
Fonda and featuring Edna May Oliver, John Carra- 
dine, Dorris Bowdon, Jessie Ralph, Arthur Shields, 
Robert Lowery and Roger Imhof, with hundreds of 
others. Directed by John Ford. A Zanuck super spe- 
cial. Now cutting. 

HOLLYWOOD CAVALCADE — A Technicolor super 

special. A romantic story of the ever-changing Holly- 
wood, of the dramatic development of motion pic- 
tures over a period of 20 years from the days of Mack 
Sennett’s bathing beauties and Keystone Cops to 
today. One of the most glamorous stories inspired by 
the amusement industry, revealing the trials and 
tribulations of a man and woman who rise from an 
inconspicuous place in the scheme of life to fabulous 
fame and fortune, the personal conquest of two people 
who truly bring the world to their feet. Don Ameche 
plays a “shoe-string” pioneer, who revolutionizes 
motion pictures and brings to world fame an unknown 
understudy from the Broadway stage, a role played 
by Alice Faye. Others in the cast including J. Edward 
Bromberg, Alan Curtis, Stuart Erwin, Jed Prouty, 
Buster Keaton, Donald Meek, George Givot, Eddie 
Collins, Ben Turpin, Hank Mann, Heinie Conklin, 
James Finlayson, Chick Chandler, Robert Lowery, 
Mary Forbes, Chester Conklin, Marjorie Beebe, Rin 
Tin Tin, Jr., and others. Based on a story by Hilary 
Lynn and Brown Holmes, with screenplay by Ernest 
Pascal. Based on an original idea by Lou Breslow. 
Directed by Irving Cummings. A Zanuck super spe- | 
cial. Smash hit of the day, according to wired ] 
reports on pre-release openings. 

THE GRAPES OF WRATH — The most sensational 
best-selling novel of this century, by John Steinbeck. 
Still leading the world in sales among popular novels. 

A sensational expose of a condition that threatens to 
affect the people of an entire nation. The most start- 
ling emigration in the history of American economics. 
One of the most important undertakings of this indus- ] 
try and the most important special on the 1939-40 
lineup from point of public interest. Henry Fonda was 
this week given the male lead. Others in the cast are j 
Walter Brennan, Beulah Bondi, John Carradine, Frank 
Darien, Dorris Bowdon, Eddie Quillan, Russell Simp- j 
son, Charles Grapewin, John Qualen, Frank Sully, 
Jane Darwell, O. Z. Whitehead and Zeffie Tillbury. [ 
The story concerns a people, impoverished by dust j 
storms and economic upheavals, roaming the West in [ 
search of a place they can start life all over again, J 
where they can make a home, only to find themselves 
unwanted in a land they had believed truly opened its 
heai'ts to their own refugees, a stirring dramatization 
of a vital problem that this nation must solve. What 
“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was in its days “The Grapes 
of Wrath” is to America today. Author Steinbeck has 
approved Nunnally Johnson’s screenplay. John Ford 
will direct. A Zanuck super special. In production. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK — Based on the famous play , 

of Rita Johnson Young. Not a re-make of the silent [ 
picture story, but an up-to-date, entirely new drama- | 
tization of the greatest city in the world during its 
days of infancy, of its first development. Story is 
developed around the romantic and turbulent days of 
Robert Fulton when a mocking world was startled by 
his invention of the steamboat. A colorful drama of 
New York’s most colorful days, when Broadway, Park 
Avenue wei'e in the making. Co-starring Richard 
Greene as Robert Fulton, Alice Faye as the inn- 
keeper’s daughter, and Fred MacMurray as the young- 
shipbuilder. Bi-enda Joyce, who is scoring a personal 
triumph with her performance in “The Rains Came,” 
and Henry Stephenson also are in the cast. Henry [ 
King, who megaphoned “In Old Chicago,” “Alexan- j 
der’s Ragtime Band,” “Jesse James,” “Stanley and i 
Livingstone” and other smash-hits, is the director. 
A Zanuck special. In production. 


f 

i 

i 

I 

r 

I 


I 


i 


— t 



j ZANUCK SPECIALS 

L. ! 


Swaneee River (t) 

Little Old New York 
Hollywood Cavalcade (t) 

Drums Along the Mohawk (t) 
The Rains Came 
The Grapes of Wrath 
Maeterlinck's The Blue Bird 
(T) 

Mark of Zorro 
Brigham Young 

Everything Happens At Night 

(s) 

Shadows in the Snow (s) 

Stanley and Livingstone 


Irving Berlin’s Say It With ? 

Music 
First Kiss 
Johnny Apollo 
Postman Walks Alone 
Dance with the Devil 
Lady Jane (T) 

Here I Am a Stranger 
Untitled Warner Baxter Special | 
Elsa Maxwell’s Hotel for Women j 
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes = 
He Married His Wife 
White Lady of the Orient 


fraud by a mankind for which he sacrificed his all. 
Story outline and historical research by Hal Long: 
and Sam Heilman, with screenplay by Philip Dunne 
and Julien Josephson. Cast headed by Spencer Tracv. 
Richard Greene, Nancy Kelly, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, 
Charles Coburn, Henry Hull and Henry Travers. 
Jungle sequences filmed in Africa by Otto Brower. 
Production directed by Henry King. A Zanuck spe- 
cial. Released. 

THE BLUE BIRD — Technicolor super special. Maeter- 
linck’s great story. This company paid $100,000 for 
the rights to this story. One of the most beautiful 
fantasies ever to be transferred to the screen, with 
Maeterlinck personally enthusing over the screen 
play, which Ernest Pascal has written. Being pro- 
duced on a lavish scale and unquestionably the most 
important vehicle in which Shirley Temple has 
appeared to date. So far the cast includes Shirley 
Temple, Helen Ericson, Sybil Jason, Gale Sondergaard, 
Nigel Bruce, Johnny Russell, Eddie Collins, Spring 
Byington, Laura Hope Crews, Cecelia Loftus, A1 
Shean, Jessie Ralph and Leona Roberts. Walter Lang 
directing. A Zanuck super special. In production. 


NOTES: (f) Technicolor. (T) Shirley Temple, (s) Sonja Henie. 


— r 

0 

1 


WURTZEL 


PRODUCT j! 


JANE WITHERS (4) 

1 — Chicken Wagon Family 

2 — Pack Up Your Troubles 

3 — High School 

4 — Shooting High 
CISCO KID (3) 

1 — Cisco Kid and the Lady 

2— Untitled 

3 — Untitled 


CHARLIE CHAN (4) 

1 — At Treasure Island 

2 — City of Darkness 

3 — In Panama 

4 — Oriental Cruise 
JONES FAMILY (4) 

1 — Quick Millions 

2 — Too Busy to Work 

3 — Young as You Feel 

4 — Untitled 

20,000 Men a Year 
The Man Who Wouldn’t Talk 
Peter B. Kyne story 
The Californian 
Heaven with a Barbed Wire 
Fence 

Stop, Look and Love 
The Escape 

The Honeymoon’s Over (t) 

The City 


| NOTE: (t) Formerly titled “The Simple Life.’’ ; 


MISCELLANEOUS 


_u 


BRITISH PRODUCTIONS 


1— Shipyard Sally <*), (**) 

2 — Inspector Hornleigh on Hol- 

iday (**) 


3— So This Is London <**) 

4— Untitled <**) 


NOTES: (*) Gracie Fields. (**) Completed. 


RE-ISSUES 

1 — The Road to Glory 2 — First World War 


THE RAINS CAME — The sensational triumph of the 

day. Just opened to smash SRO business at the Roxy 
theatre in New York. A classic picturization of 
another best seller in its day, written by Louis Brom- 
field. Superlatively praised by New York critics as 
a picture eclipsing in thrills and spectacles such hits 
as “San Francisco,” “In Old Chicago,” “Alexander’s 
Ragtime Band” and “Stanley and Livingstone,” giv- 
ing this company a new star in Brenda Joyce. Every 
critic in New York predicted that it will do sensational 
box office business and referred to the applause that 
greeted every showing at the Roxy on Friday. One 
of this company’s costliest productions. Co-starring 
Tyrone Power, Myrna Loy and George Brent, with 
Maria Ouspenskaya, Nigel Bruce, Mary Nash, Jane 
Darwell, Joseph Schildkraut, Marjorie Rambeau, 
Henry Travers, H. B. Warner and thousands of others. 
Directed by Clarence Brown. Has consistently ex- 
ceeded grosses earned by “Jesse James.” Released. 

MARK OF ZORRO — With Tyrone Power heading an 
all-star cast. This will be one of Zanuck’s more impor- 
tant productions for this season. Based on greatest 
romantic legend of early California. First made 
famous by Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., it will be brought 
back to the screen in all its picturesque glory. It is 
a drama of proud aristocracy of the sunkissed State ! 
against helpless labor, with one man having courage i 
to denounce the wave of greed surging through the 
aristocracy from which he came — a daring, romantic 
young Mexican fighting for the downtrodden. Further 
details on cast and director later. Will go into produc- 
tion Nov. 27. 

STANLEY AND LIVINGSTONE— The outstanding box 
office hit so far this 1939-40 season. Has played four 
weeks in seven big cities and three-week engagements 
in 54 other spots. A holdover in most situations. Has 
time and again exceeded the earnings of “Jesse 
James,” with some branches already reporting repeat 
runs later. Unquestionably Spencer Tracy’s best pic- 
ture and outgrossing nationally his famous “Boy’s 
Town.” A drama from real life of a man branded a 


BRIGHAM YOUNG— Based on a story, “Children of 
God” by Vardis Fisher, which won the Harper prize 
for its author. Louis Bromfield, author of “The Rains 
Came,” has written the screenplay which has been 
approved by the Mormon Church of Utah which has 
cooperated with the studio in the preparation of this 
sensational story of Brigham Young. The story begins 
in Liberty, 111., about the middle of the last century 
and follows the extraordinary life of this most 
extraordinary American who re-built an important 
part of a new nation. Throughout it runs a dramatic 
story of two people. Cast is now being selected. It 
is one of the company’s major 1939-40 productions. 
Shooting will start in October. No director has yet 
been selected. A Zanuck super special. 

FIRST KISS — Formerly titled “Daytime Wife.” — A 

domestic farce comedy of a wife who believes in 
fighting the eternal triangle with fire. Formerly 
referred to as “Part-Time Wife” and “A Deal in 
Hearts.” Originally this gay comedy was produced 
as a successful play in London. It is the story 
of an ordinary, every-day wife very much in love and 
jealous of her handsome husband. One of the craziest 
and, at the same time, funniest triangles Zanuck has 
put together for a special. Co-starring Tyrone Power, 
and Linda Darnell, with Binnie Barnes, Wendy Barrie, 
Warren William, Joan Davis and Joan Valerie. Greg- 
ory Ratoff, who megaphoned “Hotel for Women,” and 
“Husband, Wife and Friend,” is directing this breezy 
comedy. A Zanuck special. In production. 

EVERYTHING HAPPENS AT NIGHT— A tailor-made 

story of the daughter of a political refugee sought by 
his enemies, giving Sonja Henie a role entirely dif- 
ferent from any she has played to date. This highly 
dramatic story provides her with delightful comedy 
and emotional situations that will exalt her popular- 
ity. A story as new as the front page of tomorrow’s 
newspaper, packed with gaiety, intrigue, skating car- 
nivals, romance and suspense. Opposite Sonja Henie 
is Ray Milland, borrowed from Paramount. Others 
in cast: Robert Cummings, Maurice Moscovitch, Alan 
Dinehart, Fritz Feld, Leonid Kinskey and Jody Gil- 
bert. Irving Cummings is directing. A Zanuck spe- 
cial. In production. 

SHADOWS IN THE SNOW— This story will be the 

most complete change of pace Sonja Henie ever had. 
She will share the stage with S. S. Van Dine’s famous 
detective, Philo Vance, in the solution of an exciting 
and unusual murder mystery. This story will be 
serialized — then issued in novel form before our 
picture is released. In his masterly way, the late 
Van Dine tied the skating triumph into the romance 
and the solution of the mystery. 

SAY IT WITH MUSIC— An Irving Berlin Musical. Built 

on a similar, but larger scale than “Alexander’s Rag- 
time Band.” Just as in Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” 
this has a well-connected story, with romance running 
through it. Among the Berlin song hits to be heard 
will be “Always,” “Russian Lullaby,” “My Wife’s 
Gone to the Country,” “At the Devil’s Ball,” “As 
Deep as the Ocean,” “My Sweetie,” “Call Me Up 
Some Rainy Afternoon,” “When I Lost You,” “When 
I Leave the World Behind,” “Mandy,” “You’d Be 
Surprised,” “All By Myself,” “Lady of the Evening,” 
“The Song Is Ended,” “Putting on the Ritz,” “Say 
It Isn’t So” and “Because I Love You.” It will have 
an all-star cast, headed by Alice Faye, with studio 
negotiating for the services of Grace Moore for a 
co-starring role. 

HERE I AM A STRANGER— A powerful Satur- 
day Evening Post story that ranks with Deeping’s 
immortal “Sorrel and Son.” It is the story of a son 
rejuvenating his father against the wishes of his 
mother and step-father — and it is a great, powerful, 
dramatic story of the love between father and son. 
Will star Richard Greene, Brenda Joyce, Roland 
Young, Richard Dix, Gladys George, Kay Aldridge, 
John Arledge and others. Directed by Roy Del Ruth. 
Released. 

LADY JANE — Shirley Temple’s second of her two pro- 
ductions for 1939-40 release. It is based on the classic 
written by Mrs. C. V. Jamison. It has been in the 

Continued on Page 4A 


4A 


STUDIO SPECIAL 


UP-TO-THE-MINUTE DATA ON K-7 PRODUCT 






Continued from Page 3A 

best seller class — not for a few years, but for nearly 
half a century. It has only recently gone into its 
36th printing. In many schools it is obligatory read- 
ing. It is unique as a Temple story; unique because it 
is a mystery story. It’s a story of New Orleans 
peopled with Creoles and French and graceful and 
charming human relics of by-gone days. It has its 
climax in the celebrated Mardi Gras. The picture 
gives Shirley every possibility of showing to the very 
best advantage — and, as previously advised, never 
again will you see Shirley Temple in anything but 
the highest budgeted pictures. Walter Lang will 
direct “Lady Jane.” Brenda Joyce will be in the cast. 
Production starts in November. 

HE MARRIED HIS WIFE — A fast and as funny a yarn 
ever spun in swing-time. What happens when a 
husband tries to do his ex-wife a favor and finds 
her a new mate. The whole story is a masculine 
psychology that backfires. Zanuck is lining up one 
of the best casts yet set up for one of his specials. 
Already signed for major roles in this important 
all-star cast are Joel McCrea and Nancy Kelly. 
Mary Boland, Roland Young, Lyle Talbot, Mary Healy 
and Elisha Cook, Jr., also are in the cast. Roy Del 
Ruth is the director. In production. 

JOHNNY APOLLO — By Roland Brown, the author of 

“Angels with Dirty Faces,” and A. M. Engle. A 
strong story of crime and the underworld — of a rich 
father at the head of a vast financial enterprise that 
survives the panic of 1929, but becomes weakened due 
to the strain of the crisis. It has a powerful climax — 
wherein a man again fits himself to take his place as 
an honorable citizen. It has romance and is one of the 
strongest plays in which Tyrone Power will have ap- 
peared. Nancy Kelly and Edward Arnold will co-star. 
Will be made later in season with Irving Cummings 
scheduled to direct. Production starts in December. 

DANCE WITH THE DEVIL — It is the modern man’s 
struggle for the welfare of mankind, an ordeal that 
eventually leads him into a bare-knuckled conflict with 
his own brother. And it’s the love drama of a show- 
boat entertainer; a moving dramatic tale laid against 
the background of the turbulent Mississippi. It is 
reputed to be the greatest story of a crusading clergy- 
man since Hall Caine’s “The Christian.” Don 
Ameche and George Raft are set for the two leading 
roles. The authoress of the story is Eleanor Griffin, 
who was the authoress of “Boys’ Town,” the Academy 
Award winner. Roland Brown wrote the screen 
treatment. 

ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES— A mystery 
drama based on the world-famous Sir Arthur Conan 
Doyle story, with screenplay by Edwin Blum and 
Gene Markel. Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, who 
played Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, respectively, 
in “The Hound of the Baskervilles,” are re-enacting 
those roles in this production. Ida Lupino and Alan 
Marshall play the romantic roles. Alfred Werker is 
the director. Released. 

THE POSTMAN WALKS ALONE— This amazing title 

presents one of the greatest stories on the entire 
1939-40 list. Samuel Ornitz, famed writer, brought 
the basic subject matter of this picture to the studio. 
It is the story of a common, everyday letter-carrier 
in any American city. In this case he is a mail man 
and a member of the American Legion. Henry Fanda 
will play the mail man. 

UNTITLED SPECIAL— Starring Warner Baxter with 

a stellar supporting cast. An outdoor romance in 
which Baxter will play a devil-may-care vagabond. 
A custom-made story that was originally scheduled 
for next season, but which will be made for 1939-40 
release, substituting for the previously announced 
“Uncensored” (formerly known as “Scotland Yard”) 
which will not be made owing to the fact that Jane 
Baxter and Edmund Gwenn, British stars signed for 
featured roles, are not available due to the European 
war. Further details on the untitled Warner Baxter 
special later. A Zanuck production. Will be started 
in October. 

ELSA MAXWELL’S HOTEL FOR WOMEN— An ex- 
ploitation production revealing the drama and loves 
of New York’s new glamour girls, the professional 
models. An outstanding box office hit wherever show- 
men have taken local advantage of its numerous 
exploitation possibilities. Introduces a new star, Linda 
Darnell. Others featured in the cast include Ann 
Sothern, James Ellison, Elsa Maxwell herself, Lynn 
Bari, Joyce Compton, Jean Rogers and many others. 
A Cosmopolitan production. Directed by Gregory 
Ratoff. A Zanuck production. Released. 

WHITE LADY OF THE ORIENT — A melodramatic 

story of an American blonde adventuress whose entire 
life’s course is changed, and startlingly so by extraor- 
dinary maneuvers of the Oriental. Alice Faye and 
Warner Baxter head the cast, which includes Charles 
Winninger, Joseph Schildkraut, Arthur Treacher and 
many others. Directed by Gregory Ratoff. In the cut- 
ting room. 

20,000 MEN A YEAR — A Cosmopolitan production. 
Here is America’s dramatic answer to defiant shouts 
of war, the posturings of the saber-rattling dictators. 
President Roosevelt, realizing this is an electrifying 
appeal to the country, has won approval of his plan 
for the training of 20,000 new aviators each year, a 


j SUMMARY OF K-7 PROGRAM 

_ Asof0ct . 6 

i 

j FEATURE PRODUCT 


Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck 24 

Produced by Sol M. Wurtzel 24 

Produced by R. T. Kane in England 4 


i 


Total K-7 11939-40) 


Features 


52 


| 


SHORT SUBJECTS 


Produced by Movietone: 

Vyvyan Donner's Fashion Forecasts in Technicolor 

Lowell Thomas’ Magic Carpets 

True-Life Dramas of Cameramen 

Ed Thorgersen’s Sports Reviews 

Novelties 

Featurettes 

Total 26 


Terrytoons (10 in Technicolor) 26 

! 

MOVIETONE NEWS 


Issued Twice Every Week 




great reserve of flyers — young men selected from col- 
leges. From this timely and unprecedented develop- 
ment in aviation, the studio plans to make a major 
production, with the cooperation of the United States 
Government. Commander Frank Wead is the author. 
While the theme is aviation, it is not a picture of 
the air. It is the story of an old-time hard-boiled 
pilot, kicked out of the Air Service because he can 
no longer pass the physical examination. He is an 
illiterate person who never went past the fourth grade 
in school — who finds himself at one of the smartest 
universities of the country, where he is pitted against 
the intelligentsia. The cast includes Randolph Scott, 
Margaret Lindsay, Mary Healy, Preston Foster, 
Kane Richmond, Maxie Rosenbloom (borrowed from 
Warner Bros.), Robert Shaw, Eric Blore and George 
Ernest, Alfred E. Green is the director. Screenplay is 
by Lou Breslow and Owen Francis. In cutting room! 

THE HONEYMOON’S OVER— Formerly titled “The 
Simple Life.” A Wurtzel production based on 
an original story by William Anthony McGuire, deal- 
ing with the hilarious adventures of a young married 
couple who live beyond their means. Marjorie Weaver 
and Stuart Erwin will be featured as the young and 
misguided couple. Chick Chandler also is in the cast. 
Miss Weaver and Erwin will be re-united for the first 
time since their triumph in “Second Honeymoon” 
several years ago. William Beaudine is the director. 
In the cutting room. 

THE CITY — A timely melodrama of today. Another 

of Wurtzel’s specials. A moving, romantic story based 
on the screenplay by John Larkin. Donald Wood, 
Amanda Duff, June Gale, Robert Lowery, Alexander 
D’Arcy and Edward Marr. C. Aubrey Smith also is 
set. Ricardo Cortez is the director. In production. 


S ERI ES FOR 1939-40 


4— TECHNICOLOR SUPER SPECIALS— (1) “Hollywood Caval- 
cade,” (2) “Drums Along the Mohawk,” (3) Maeterlinck’s “The 
Blue Bird” and (4) "Swanee River.” 

2 — SHIRLEY TEMPLE — Maeterlinck’s “The Blue Bird” with an 

all-star cast, in Technicolor, and "Lady Jane.” 

2 — SONJA HENIE — “Everything Happens at Night” and S. S. Van 

Dine's "Shadows in the Snow." 

4— JANE WITHERS— (1) “Chicken Wagon Family" with Leo 

Carrillo, (2) “Pack Up Your Troubles," with the Ritz Brothers, 
(3) “High School” and (4) "Shooting High” with Gene Autry. 

4 — CHARLIE CHANS — (1) “Charlie Chan at Treasure Island,” 

(2) "Charlie Chan in a City of Darkness,” (3) “Charlie Chan 
in Panama,” and (4) “Charlie Chan's Oriental Cruise.” 

4 — JONES FAMILY— (1) “Jones Family in Quick Millions,” (2) 

“Jones Family In Too Busy To Work,” (3) “Young As You Feel," 
and (4) Untitled. 

3 — CISCO KID STORIES— Starring Cesar Romero in the title role. 

First is "The Cisco Kid and the Lady" with Marjorie Weaver 
and Virginia Field. 

4— INTERNATIONAL SPECIALS— (1) “Shipyard Sally” with 

Grac-ie Fields and Sidney Howard, (2) “Inspector Hornleigh On 
Holiday,” with Gordon Harker and Alastair Sim, (3) “So This Is 
London” with Berton Churchill, George Sanders, Fay Compton, 
Robertson Hare, Lily Cahill and others, (4) The fourth will be 
selected from these also completed productions, “A Girl Must 
Live” or "They Came By Night.” 


THE MAN WHO WOULDN’T TALK— One of Wurtzel’s 
specials, based on the play, “The Valiant” by Hol- 
worthy Hall and Robert Middlemass. The drama of 
a man who preferred death for himself rather than 
contribute to the unhappiness of one dear to him. One 
of the most powerful dramas ever written. Screenplay 
by Robert Ellis and Helen Logan. Lloyd Nolan will 
play the title role. Jean Rogers, Mae Marsh and 
Onslow Stevens also are in cast. David Barton is the 
director. In production. 

PETER B. KYNE STORY— Based on story, “Corn Cob 
Kelly,” but a new title will be announced later. More 
details later. 

THE CALIFORNIAN — An original story by Sam Hell- 
man whose purchase was announced in this publica- 
tion only last week. Originally intended as a Zanuck 
special, this story will be transferred to the screen 
as another Wurtzel “surprise” super, with an impor- 
tant cast. The story covers the period before and after 
the discovery of gold at Sutter’s Fort, and dramati- 
cally, as well as romantically, follows the rise of Cali- 
fornia as a State in the Union. Further details later. 

THE ESCAPE — A melodrama of the slums. The story 
of slum youngsters who branch out in widely con- 
trasting spheres in life and what the world does to 
them. Based on an original screenplay by Robert 
Ellis and Helen Logan. With Kane Richmond, Amanda 
Duff, June Gale, Edward Norris, Henry Armetta, 
Frank Reicher and others. Directed by Ricardo Cor- 
tez. 

HEAVEN WITH A BARBED WIRE FENCE— Melo- 
drama of boys and girls of the road. The story tells 
of the adventures of a 19-year-old boy who vainly 
tries to find employment and of an orphan who has 
run away from an institution in which he had been 
confined since infancy. Based on an original story by 
Dalton Trumbo. With Jean Rogers, Raymond Wal- 
burn, Marjorie Rambeau, Glenn Ford, Nicholas Conte, 
Eddie Collins and others. Directed by Ricardo Cortez. 
Delivered to New York. 

CISCO KID SERIES — -A new series with Cesar Romero 
playing the title role. The first is “The Cisco Kid and 
the Lady” (formerly titled “The Adventurer”). Co- 
featured with Romero are Marjorie Weaver, Vir- 
ginia Field, George Montgomery, Robert Barrat, 
John Beach and others. Herbert I. Leeds is the 
director. In production. There will be three releases 
in this series. Stories for second and third pictures 
have not been titled. 

JANE WITHERS SERIES — Four in this series present- 
ing a grown-up and new Jane Withers. First two 
releases have been completed; “Chicken Wagon Fam- 
ily” with Leo Carrillo, Marjorie Weaver, Spring 
Byington and others; second, “Pack Up Your 
Troubles” co-starring the Ritz Brothers. Third in the 
series is entitled “High School,” and has been com- 
pleted with cast supporting Jane including George 
Ernest, Lynn Roberts, Cliff Edwards, Joe Brown, Jr., 
Lillian Porter and others. Fourth of the series is based 
on story, “Jubilo,” titled “Shooting High” and will 
co-star Jane with the world’s most popular cowboy, 
the crooning Gene Autry. Production on “Shooting- 
High” starts October 28. 

j CHARLIE CHAN SERIES — Four in this series. They 
are: (1) “Charlie Chan at Treasure Island” with Cesar 
Romero, Pauline Moore, Sen Yung, Sally Blane and 
others; (2) “Charlie Chan in a City in Darkness” with 
Lynn Bari, Sen Yung, Pedro De Cordoba and others; 
(3) “Charlie Chan in Panama,” which starts next 
month, and (4) “Charlie Chan’s Oriental Cruise.” 
First has been released. Second is in the cutting room. 

JONES FAMILY SERIES — Four will constitute this 
series. Starring the original Jones Family cast. First, 
“Quick Millions,” with the Jones Family, Eddie Col- 
lins, Robert Shaw, John T. Murray and others has 
been delivered. Second is “Too Busy to Work” and 
is now in the cutting room. Joan Davis is co-featured 
with the Jones Family cast in “Too Busy to Work,” 
which is in the cutting room. Third will be “Young 
As You Feel.” Fourth has not yet been titled. 


BRITISH PRODUCTIONS 


4 INTERNATIONAL SPECIALS — Negatives of six 
of these British-made specials are ready and five are 
now at the Home Office. From the six, a total of 
four will be selected for release on the Domestic mar- 
ket, one every three months. The first, “Shipyard 
Sally” with Gracie Fields, is scheduled for release Oct. 
20 and was directed by Monty Banks. The second, 
to be released in January, is “Inspector Hornleigh 
On Vacation,” featuring Gordon Harker as the Scot- 
land Yard sleuth, and Alastair Sim. The third will 
be a picturization of George M. Cohan’s “So This Is 
London” with Berton Churchill playing the American 
“Babbitt” role that Will Rogers enacted in the ver- 
sion this company produced eight years ago, and a 
supporting cast of international favorites, including 
George Sanders, Robertson Hare, Fay’ Compton, Lily 
Cahill and others. “So This Is London” was di- 
rected by the American director, Thornton Freeland. 
The fourth will be selected from the three other com- 
pleted specials. This assures the Domestic organiza- 
tion releasing a program of 52 feature-length produc- 
tions during the 1939-40 season, as originally an- 
nounced, regardless of the presence of war in Europe. 


Printed in U S A. 



Scanned from the collection of 

Karl Thiede 


Coordinated by the 

Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproj ect.org